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April 25, 2024, 03:43:24 pm

Author Topic: VCE English Language Question Thread  (Read 153807 times)  Share 

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EulerFan102

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #345 on: July 09, 2021, 03:40:18 pm »
+5
hi all,

could anyone explain what deference and disfluency are??? i know they're not on the study design, but my teacher wants us to know what they are anyway - despite never having taught us what they are in the first place or mentioning these terms in ANY ppts or other resources...  ::)

Okay, so I'll give my thoughts here but I'd strongly recommend checking in with your teacher and getting their thoughts on what deference and disfluency are.

Deference is a way of behaving that shows respect to whoever you're speaking to. I think it would most closely relate to the EngLang concept of face needs, particularly maintaining a speaker's negative face needs. For example, if a police officer pulls you over and addresses you as "sir", they are showing a level of respect to you (deference) by respecting your boundaries (negative face needs).

A disfluency is a break or interruption to an utterance. The term on the VCAA Study Design that we'd use instead is non-fluency feature, and VCAA lists a bunch of non-fluency features on the Study Design: stuff like pauses, pause fillers, false starts and repairs. Keep in mind that the name 'disfluency' or 'non-fluency feature' is a bit of a bad name because these features occur all the time in normal speech and we don't really notice them, so they often won't make speech that much less fluent.

Texyrialed

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #346 on: July 13, 2021, 10:35:17 pm »
+1
Hi all,

My English Language teacher told us that if we want to talk about phonetics in our expository essay, we'd need to use the IPA. However, in all the high-scoring/exemplar essays that I've read that mentions pronunciations of words in, I've never come across one that has any IPA symbols in it, just how one would write it out (e.g. 'parsta' vs 'pasta'), which leads me to my question;
Do we reaaally need to use the IPA in our essays or is spelling it out acceptable?

Thanks guys,
-Riley
2020: Biology [32]
2021: English Lang (30+), Maths Methods (25+), Psychology (35+), Further Mathematics (40+), Chemistry (30+, but my teacher expects a 45+ rip)
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EulerFan102

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #347 on: July 14, 2021, 05:19:14 pm »
+2
Hi all,

My English Language teacher told us that if we want to talk about phonetics in our expository essay, we'd need to use the IPA. However, in all the high-scoring/exemplar essays that I've read that mentions pronunciations of words in, I've never come across one that has any IPA symbols in it, just how one would write it out (e.g. 'parsta' vs 'pasta'), which leads me to my question;
Do we reaaally need to use the IPA in our essays or is spelling it out acceptable?

Thanks guys,
-Riley

Hey! Good question!

Short answer: I agree with your teacher.

Much longer answer:

So let's first have a look at what VCAA say they want you to know. They say that students should have an "an awareness of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and the phonetic transcription of Australian English" (Study Design, p. 17, link here). What exactly an "awareness" of the IPA is has never really been super clear: the IPA has never been (and, I think, will never be) directly assessed on the exam. The reason is that the IPA is just too complicated, with just too many symbols for anyone to bother remembering. So you'll never see an exam question expecting you to know and use any IPA symbols.

So what's the point of having IPA on the Study Design then? Well, using IPA symbols is a good way to try and show off your linguistic expertise in an essay. Anytime your example is related to phonetics (e.g. variation in the Australian accent, features of a particular ethnolect), you can flex your EngLang prowess with some accompanying IPA symbols. For example, I went into the exam with some memorised IPA symbols relating to the diphthongisation of the broad accent.

Remember that the IPA was invented to make it really easy for linguists to describe sounds. So instead of writing "pasta" or "parsta", with the IPA symbols /pastə/, linguists can precisely describing each phoneme in a word. (This notation of the slashes is the conventional way to present IPA symbols.) If you're wanting to find the IPA representation of a word, most online dictionaries have IPA for each entry. Other good resources include interactive IPA charts (like this one) and these Australian-specific resources on vowel and consonant sounds.

Sathu

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #348 on: August 19, 2021, 12:56:14 am »
0
hey guys,
I am in year 10 and I would like to know if english is my strong suit and if it is, I'll probs do eng lit. I have attached my argument analysis that i wrote earlier in the year, please feel free to let me know.

Through the countless debates and solutions proposed to prevent the heavy road toll, Johnathan Sprinter puts forth his take on the issue. In his letter to the editor, ‘P – Plate extensions Overdue’, Sprinter confidently claims that extending a 7- year restriction on p – platers, is the answer to the ongoing conundrum. The author appeals to the general public – more specifically, anyone who has the qualifications to drive. By doing so, his desperate need to have a large crowd on his side is evident.

From the outset, the author highlights the necessity of a 7-year restriction, by linking it to one of the most widespread causes of road accidents – drink driving. Sprinter introduces his viewpoint and the expectation he has towards the reader by posing a rhetorical question ‘If there was just one solution to prevent the heavy road toll... isn’t worth a try?’ This influences the reader to subconsciously agree with Sprinter’s question and therefore, formulate opinions that most likely support his contention. Moreover, Sprinter’s reference to the assistant commissioner of traffic control, not only makes his arguments seem more credible but also, creates a tone of seriousness within the reader, further advocating the importance of the matter at hand. Overall, Sprinter uses drink driving to attract the reader’s attention, simultaneously, underlining the need for an extension.

In the body, the author criticizes the irresponsible nature of p-plate drivers, continuously emphasizing the instability they hold. ‘Such irresponsible drivers… destroy their own lives (and) the lives of their families’. Sprinter paints a view that p-platers are a threat to not only themselves but also the lives of others, thus, positioning the readers to see p-platers as something dangerous. Building on this, Sprinter uses expert evidence from Professor Barton, a neurosurgeon at Coolabar Hospital, to state that ‘young adults are more likely make poor-split-second decisions on the road… since their brains aren’t fully developed’, the author denigrates the capabilities of p-plater drivers and portrays them as unstable. Further, influencing the reader to devalue p-platers as a subject. In a similar manner, Sprinter discloses an incident involving Emma Richardson- a teenage p-plater, who crashed her car after partying all night. The account of Emma severs as a closing evidence to proving Sprinter’s argument, where he once again, reinforces the idea that, p-platers are reckless and unstable. Essentially, Sprinter depicts p-platers in a negative light, in the hopes of the reader agreeing with him and therefore supporting the necessity of an extension.

In the closing, the author emphasis the urgency in taking measures by further disparaging p-plate drivers. Sprinter appeals for action by showcasing what Sweden - a highly sustainable and technically advanced country, has achieved by reducing their alcohol levels. ‘… lowering the alcohol levels from 0.5 to 0.2 Sweden registered a distinct decrease in fatal accidents.’ Sprinter invites the reader to visualize the potential outcome of a 7-year restriction, as well as, emphasizing the moral responsibility the readers hold to minimize ‘drink driving tragedies. ’This is accompanied by the author’s tonal shift from logical to undermining as he claims, ‘this mix (alcohol and drink driving) can be particularly fatal for young adults’ Although, some might interpret this as Sprinter feeling cautious for young adults, he’s in fact, reinforcing the idea that p-platers are irresponsible. Backing up on this, the imagery with a severely damaged car, strengthens his argument and therefore, compelling the audience to side in favor with Sprinter. The author concludes with a rhetorical question ‘Isn’t worth a try?’, which fosters the idea of unification, as if Sprinter is directly asking the reader to join forces with him, which in result, may make the reader more inclined, to respond to his call for action. Ultimately, the author appeals for action by portraying himself as the more sensible option.


Harrycc3000

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #349 on: August 19, 2021, 10:58:46 pm »
+1
hey guys,
I am in year 10 and I would like to know if english is my strong suit and if it is, I'll probs do eng lit. I have attached my argument analysis that i wrote earlier in the year, please feel free to let me know.

Through the countless debates and solutions proposed to prevent the heavy road toll, Johnathan Sprinter puts forth his take on the issue. In his letter to the editor, ‘P – Plate extensions Overdue’, Sprinter confidently claims that extending a 7- year restriction on p – platers, is the answer to the ongoing conundrum. The author appeals to the general public – more specifically, anyone who has the qualifications to drive. By doing so, his desperate need to have a large crowd on his side is evident.

From the outset, the author highlights the necessity of a 7-year restriction, by linking it to one of the most widespread causes of road accidents – drink driving. Sprinter introduces his viewpoint and the expectation he has towards the reader by posing a rhetorical question ‘If there was just one solution to prevent the heavy road toll... isn’t worth a try?’ This influences the reader to subconsciously agree with Sprinter’s question and therefore, formulate opinions that most likely support his contention. Moreover, Sprinter’s reference to the assistant commissioner of traffic control, not only makes his arguments seem more credible but also, creates a tone of seriousness within the reader, further advocating the importance of the matter at hand. Overall, Sprinter uses drink driving to attract the reader’s attention, simultaneously, underlining the need for an extension.

In the body, the author criticizes the irresponsible nature of p-plate drivers, continuously emphasizing the instability they hold. ‘Such irresponsible drivers… destroy their own lives (and) the lives of their families’. Sprinter paints a view that p-platers are a threat to not only themselves but also the lives of others, thus, positioning the readers to see p-platers as something dangerous. Building on this, Sprinter uses expert evidence from Professor Barton, a neurosurgeon at Coolabar Hospital, to state that ‘young adults are more likely make poor-split-second decisions on the road… since their brains aren’t fully developed’, the author denigrates the capabilities of p-plater drivers and portrays them as unstable. Further, influencing the reader to devalue p-platers as a subject. In a similar manner, Sprinter discloses an incident involving Emma Richardson- a teenage p-plater, who crashed her car after partying all night. The account of Emma severs as a closing evidence to proving Sprinter’s argument, where he once again, reinforces the idea that, p-platers are reckless and unstable. Essentially, Sprinter depicts p-platers in a negative light, in the hopes of the reader agreeing with him and therefore supporting the necessity of an extension.

In the closing, the author emphasis the urgency in taking measures by further disparaging p-plate drivers. Sprinter appeals for action by showcasing what Sweden - a highly sustainable and technically advanced country, has achieved by reducing their alcohol levels. ‘… lowering the alcohol levels from 0.5 to 0.2 Sweden registered a distinct decrease in fatal accidents.’ Sprinter invites the reader to visualize the potential outcome of a 7-year restriction, as well as, emphasizing the moral responsibility the readers hold to minimize ‘drink driving tragedies. ’This is accompanied by the author’s tonal shift from logical to undermining as he claims, ‘this mix (alcohol and drink driving) can be particularly fatal for young adults’ Although, some might interpret this as Sprinter feeling cautious for young adults, he’s in fact, reinforcing the idea that p-platers are irresponsible. Backing up on this, the imagery with a severely damaged car, strengthens his argument and therefore, compelling the audience to side in favor with Sprinter. The author concludes with a rhetorical question ‘Isn’t worth a try?’, which fosters the idea of unification, as if Sprinter is directly asking the reader to join forces with him, which in result, may make the reader more inclined, to respond to his call for action. Ultimately, the author appeals for action by portraying himself as the more sensible option.
Hey, I think you sent this to the wrong thread. This is the English Language VCE thread which doesn't do analysis like this and this thread probably can't give you advice on literature. May be better to go ask on the English thread or the literature thread :)
VCE 2020: Biology [50]
VCE 2021: Mathematical Methods [44], Specialist Mathematics [43], Psychology [45], Chemistry [45], English Language [49]
ATAR: 99.90
UCAT: 3240 (99th)
2022-2024: UoM Bachelor of Science Majoring in Data Science (Planning on going into DDS)

Harrycc3000

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #350 on: August 26, 2021, 04:25:54 pm »
0
Hey,
I was doing insight section A and the last question was apparently marked holistically. Does this actually also happen for VCAA exams? And if they do, what are some tips (also like how do you structure your answer for these types of questions) on being able to do these 'holistic' short answer questions?



Thanks!
VCE 2020: Biology [50]
VCE 2021: Mathematical Methods [44], Specialist Mathematics [43], Psychology [45], Chemistry [45], English Language [49]
ATAR: 99.90
UCAT: 3240 (99th)
2022-2024: UoM Bachelor of Science Majoring in Data Science (Planning on going into DDS)

lastapasta

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #351 on: August 29, 2021, 04:45:14 pm »
0
hi

whats the difference between minimal responses and backchanelling?

thank you!

wingdings2791

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #352 on: August 29, 2021, 10:31:05 pm »
+4
hi

whats the difference between minimal responses and backchanelling?

thank you!

Hi lastapasta,
Minimal responses are exactly what they sound like- interjectory discourse markers such as 'yeah', 'right', 'mhmm' etc. that usually merely demonstrate agreement, encouraging the dominant speaker to continue. Backchanneling runs in a similar vein but has to specifically be repetition (at least roughly) of another interlocutor's utterances eg. 'that was worth a try', 'yeah worth a shot'- literally channeling someone's words back to them. :)
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wingdings2791

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #353 on: August 29, 2021, 10:51:50 pm »
+4
Hey,
I was doing insight section A and the last question was apparently marked holistically. Does this actually also happen for VCAA exams? And if they do, what are some tips (also like how do you structure your answer for these types of questions) on being able to do these 'holistic' short answer questions?



Thanks!

Hey! Funnily I recently asked my tutor the exact same question. She last assessed the Eng Lang exam in roughly 2018 and said that although each section A was marked entirely by one assessor, the questions were independently assessed ie. marks couldn't be awarded for a low quality Q5 answer, even if the relevant analyses and metalanguage were included in Q2 as an example.

Her advice was that while you could maybe adapt the focus of your answers to suit the others, there really isn't much you can do to exploit the holistic marking systems as assessors are pretty confined in awarding answers that have too much to do with each other. However, she still says that 'adapting focus' so that your answers cover a little more ground (eg. if there's already been a discourse question, choosing to analyse syntax or lexicology in a question that doesn't specify a subsystem) can keep your writing from becoming repetitive (as presenting the same argument in many different lights can incline assessors to award less marks). Other than that, some general section A advice from her would be to use an extremely deadpan, practical format in your answers eg. if a question calls for an example of a modal verb, an answer like 'The modal verb 'will' in 'x will [...]' shows y' will easily knock out marks as it packs everything important into one sentence. Another way to minimise writing as after all your wrist can only take so much XD

Hope this helps! Please keep in mind that what she told me could potentially be out of date, but it still seems like sensible advice to me :)
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Texyrialed

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #354 on: September 18, 2021, 11:32:29 pm »
+1
Hi Guys!

I'm currently writing a prac expository essay for the exam and the prompt that i've chosen revolves around the idea that social media impacts language.
 
Two questions;
1) does the news such as ACA, 7News, etc count as social media?
2) would words such as "vaping" and "chroming" (the thing where teens inhale aerosol deodorant stuff) be counted as neologism or blending?

Thanks!
2020: Biology [32]
2021: English Lang (30+), Maths Methods (25+), Psychology (35+), Further Mathematics (40+), Chemistry (30+, but my teacher expects a 45+ rip)
ATAR: 85+ hopefully
2022: God knows
Hotel: Trivago

Harrycc3000

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #355 on: September 19, 2021, 12:09:02 am »
+2
Hi Guys!

I'm currently writing a prac expository essay for the exam and the prompt that i've chosen revolves around the idea that social media impacts language.
 
Two questions;
1) does the news such as ACA, 7News, etc count as social media?
2) would words such as "vaping" and "chroming" (the thing where teens inhale aerosol deodorant stuff) be counted as neologism or blending?

Thanks!

Hiiiiiii I'm just another year 12 so these are just my opinions.
if the news is posted on a social media network like twitter or facebook then i would count it as social media.
May just be shortening and conversion of word class from noun vapour to verb vape? Don't think its blending because i don't know what other word it could be blended with and it could be neologism though vaping has been used for quite some time but yeah if you think vaping is some sort of new expression then yeah valid to call it a neologism. don't know where chroming comes from but may be something similar.
VCE 2020: Biology [50]
VCE 2021: Mathematical Methods [44], Specialist Mathematics [43], Psychology [45], Chemistry [45], English Language [49]
ATAR: 99.90
UCAT: 3240 (99th)
2022-2024: UoM Bachelor of Science Majoring in Data Science (Planning on going into DDS)

wingdings2791

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #356 on: September 19, 2021, 09:05:22 am »
+1
Hiiiiiii I'm just another year 12 so these are just my opinions.
if the news is posted on a social media network like twitter or facebook then i would count it as social media.
May just be shortening and conversion of word class from noun vapour to verb vape? Don't think its blending because i don't know what other word it could be blended with and it could be neologism though vaping has been used for quite some time but yeah if you think vaping is some sort of new expression then yeah valid to call it a neologism. don't know where chroming comes from but may be something similar.

Going off this, I heard in class that 'vape' is probably a shortening of the noun 'vapour', so I agree you could say that suffixing 'vape' with inflectional morpheme 'ing' converts it to the informal verb 'vaping'. Also, 'chroming' most likely came from the fact that chrome-based paints were inhaled for recreation as the paint solvent was addictive, so similar conversion of word class, echoing Harrycc3000. Unrelated but this is a great example of obfuscation- 'chroming' can certainly be misleading. :)
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Harrycc3000

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #357 on: October 03, 2021, 11:17:07 pm »
0
Need help with identity qs section A, don't know whats acceptable as an identity. I always thought in section A u could only mention stuff like cultural identity, age, occupation etc. but in vcaa 2018 sec a they had examples like 'someone who was absent-minded' which I feel like I wouldn't bring myself to write about on an exam because someone's personality isn't explicitly stated as an identity on the study design. Does anyone have any clarification on what vcaa accepts or does not accept as an identity?


Thanks!
VCE 2020: Biology [50]
VCE 2021: Mathematical Methods [44], Specialist Mathematics [43], Psychology [45], Chemistry [45], English Language [49]
ATAR: 99.90
UCAT: 3240 (99th)
2022-2024: UoM Bachelor of Science Majoring in Data Science (Planning on going into DDS)

Kat484

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #358 on: October 07, 2021, 08:41:10 pm »
0
Does English Language have any oral presentations or is it more written responses?

biology1234

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #359 on: October 07, 2021, 10:27:16 pm »
0
hi all,
what does it mean what is the texts social purpose