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July 18, 2024, 10:58:03 am

Author Topic: Science Degrees  (Read 8090 times)  Share 

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mark_alec

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Re: Science Degrees
« Reply #15 on: September 24, 2009, 09:06:39 am »
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It is typically about 99.5, with an intake of <dozen a year.

appianway

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Re: Science Degrees
« Reply #16 on: September 24, 2009, 09:25:36 am »
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I think last year it dropped down to about 99.2, but even so, that's still a freakishly high ENTER.

humph

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Re: Science Degrees
« Reply #17 on: September 24, 2009, 11:10:48 am »
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Out of these degrees, which one do you think is the most prestigious?

BSc @ Melbourne
BSc (Scholars Program) @ Monash
PhB (Science) @ ANU

Are there any particular advantages or disadvantages of each degree (excluding location) ?

Also is there a big difference between doing a normal 'BSc' and doing one of these hyped up programs like they offer at Monash or ANU?

Thanks
Difference for PhB at least is certainly noticable - we basically get much more personal treatment than normal science students. As far as the "research" component goes, it can be a bit hit and miss. I personally enjoy my Advanced Studies Courses a whole lot, but in all fairness in maths they're usually just studying something more advanced than you'd usually see at an undergraduate level. Mind you, I have friends who in second year physics have done ASCs that led them to help making major breakthroughs, and they got to go along to conferences and be a coauthor in published papers.

I think last year it dropped down to about 99.2, but even so, that's still a freakishly high ENTER.
It's about the same as PhB at ANU (though that's more about 30 people a year, and usually two or three of them are below 99).
VCE 2006
PhB (Hons) (Sc), ANU, 2007-2010
MPhil, ANU, 2011-2012
PhD, Princeton, 2012-2017
Research Associate, University College London, 2017-2020
Assistant Professor, University of Virginia, 2020-

Feel free to ask me about (advanced) mathematics.

appianway

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Re: Science Degrees
« Reply #18 on: September 24, 2009, 11:23:26 am »
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Hang on, conferences in 2nd year physics?!?!?! Geniuses.

So you CAN accelerate the PhB? Hmm, maybe I'll go to ANU.

vexx

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Re: Science Degrees
« Reply #19 on: September 24, 2009, 12:28:51 pm »
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It is typically about 99.5, with an intake of <dozen a year.

oh wow, that's so high. it doesn't even look that different to the normal course! does anyone know the differences between that and the normal Bsc  :P
« Last Edit: September 24, 2009, 12:36:38 pm by vexx »
2010 VCE: psychology | english language | methods cas | further | chemistry | physical ed | uni chemistry || ATAR: 97.40 ||

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Y1: biology of cells&organisms | music psychology | biological psychology | secret life of language | creative writing
    || genetics&the evolution of life | biochemistry&molecular biology | techniques of molecular science -.- | mind,brain&behaviour 2

20XX: MEDICINE

QuantumJG

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Re: Science Degrees
« Reply #20 on: September 24, 2009, 01:04:59 pm »
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Out of these degrees, which one do you think is the most prestigious?

BSc @ Melbourne
BSc (Scholars Program) @ Monash
PhB (Science) @ ANU

Are there any particular advantages or disadvantages of each degree (excluding location) ?

Also is there a big difference between doing a normal 'BSc' and doing one of these hyped up programs like they offer at Monash or ANU?

Thanks
Difference for PhB at least is certainly noticable - we basically get much more personal treatment than normal science students. As far as the "research" component goes, it can be a bit hit and miss. I personally enjoy my Advanced Studies Courses a whole lot, but in all fairness in maths they're usually just studying something more advanced than you'd usually see at an undergraduate level. Mind you, I have friends who in second year physics have done ASCs that led them to help making major breakthroughs, and they got to go along to conferences and be a coauthor in published papers.

I think last year it dropped down to about 99.2, but even so, that's still a freakishly high ENTER.
It's about the same as PhB at ANU (though that's more about 30 people a year, and usually two or three of them are below 99).

I'm guessing if you are doing a PhB (Bachelor of philosophy) you are wanting to go for a PhD (Doctor of Philosophy). Can you jump from PhB to PhD, without doing an honours or masters degree?

In Victoria I'm not 100% sure but I think we don't have a PhB.
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2009 - 2011: Bachelor of Science (Mathematical Physics)

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Re: Science Degrees
« Reply #21 on: September 24, 2009, 05:05:19 pm »
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It is typically about 99.5, with an intake of <dozen a year.

oh wow, that's so high. it doesn't even look that different to the normal course! does anyone know the differences between that and the normal Bsc  :P

You get a scholarship, you don't strictly follow the course structure (i.e. you study whatever you want). You get to research faster.
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vexx

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Re: Science Degrees
« Reply #22 on: September 24, 2009, 05:17:14 pm »
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It is typically about 99.5, with an intake of <dozen a year.

oh wow, that's so high. it doesn't even look that different to the normal course! does anyone know the differences between that and the normal Bsc  :P

You get a scholarship, you don't strictly follow the course structure (i.e. you study whatever you want). You get to research faster.

ah okay thanks. i knew about the course structure bit, but still not a big difference. i'm most likely going to have it near the top of my preferences though. but i doubt i'll get 99+
2010 VCE: psychology | english language | methods cas | further | chemistry | physical ed | uni chemistry || ATAR: 97.40 ||

2011: BSc @ UoM

Y1: biology of cells&organisms | music psychology | biological psychology | secret life of language | creative writing
    || genetics&the evolution of life | biochemistry&molecular biology | techniques of molecular science -.- | mind,brain&behaviour 2

20XX: MEDICINE

humph

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Re: Science Degrees
« Reply #23 on: September 24, 2009, 05:26:22 pm »
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Out of these degrees, which one do you think is the most prestigious?

BSc @ Melbourne
BSc (Scholars Program) @ Monash
PhB (Science) @ ANU

Are there any particular advantages or disadvantages of each degree (excluding location) ?

Also is there a big difference between doing a normal 'BSc' and doing one of these hyped up programs like they offer at Monash or ANU?

Thanks
Difference for PhB at least is certainly noticable - we basically get much more personal treatment than normal science students. As far as the "research" component goes, it can be a bit hit and miss. I personally enjoy my Advanced Studies Courses a whole lot, but in all fairness in maths they're usually just studying something more advanced than you'd usually see at an undergraduate level. Mind you, I have friends who in second year physics have done ASCs that led them to help making major breakthroughs, and they got to go along to conferences and be a coauthor in published papers.

I think last year it dropped down to about 99.2, but even so, that's still a freakishly high ENTER.
It's about the same as PhB at ANU (though that's more about 30 people a year, and usually two or three of them are below 99).

I'm guessing if you are doing a PhB (Bachelor of philosophy) you are wanting to go for a PhD (Doctor of Philosophy). Can you jump from PhB to PhD, without doing an honours or masters degree?

In Victoria I'm not 100% sure but I think we don't have a PhB.
PhB has an honours year (as does Dean's scholars program at Monash). But then yes, once you've done that you can go straight to a PhD.
VCE 2006
PhB (Hons) (Sc), ANU, 2007-2010
MPhil, ANU, 2011-2012
PhD, Princeton, 2012-2017
Research Associate, University College London, 2017-2020
Assistant Professor, University of Virginia, 2020-

Feel free to ask me about (advanced) mathematics.