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February 06, 2023, 07:03:30 am

Author Topic: Why does RNA processing actually occur?  (Read 1356 times)  Share 

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s0m30n312345

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Why does RNA processing actually occur?
« on: March 18, 2022, 04:59:43 pm »
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So, I have a sac coming up and I was revising gene expression and I don't get why RNA processing actually occurs, like I get what it does and stuff, but why is it important for translation? like why does translation require the introns to be removed and a methyl-G cap and poly-A tail to be added?

Golgi Apparatus

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Re: Why does RNA processing actually occur?
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2022, 02:51:27 pm »
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The introns need to be removed because they are non-coding regions (i.e. they don't code for a protein). These are not meant to be transcribed - only the exons code for the protein. If the introns were not removed, the whole mRNA strand (introns and exons), would be transcribed. This means the amino acid sequence would be incorrect and the protein would not perform its intended function. By removing the introns, only the exons (coding regions) are transcribed, which results in the correct amino acid sequence, and therefore a properly functioning protein.
I don't know too much about the tail and cap, but I believe they give the mRNA protection and stability.
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s0m30n312345

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Re: Why does RNA processing actually occur?
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2022, 09:08:56 pm »
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oh ok. That makes sense now, thankyou!