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December 01, 2022, 02:51:29 pm

Author Topic: how to integrate quotes?  (Read 3042 times)  Share 

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rirerire

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how to integrate quotes?
« on: October 04, 2020, 05:03:52 pm »
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When integrating quotes, is it okay to use just a word from the line eg "Chong incorporates gustatory imagery throughout the work, yolks are described as "creamy" and "salty", allowing audiences to..."

I've gotten mixed feedback, some teachers say this is excellent integration while others say this shows you don't know the text well as you aren't using the whole quote. What's the best way?

angewina_naguen

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Re: how to integrate quotes?
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2020, 11:10:32 pm »
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When integrating quotes, is it okay to use just a word from the line eg "Chong incorporates gustatory imagery throughout the work, yolks are described as "creamy" and "salty", allowing audiences to..."

I've gotten mixed feedback, some teachers say this is excellent integration while others say this shows you don't know the text well as you aren't using the whole quote. What's the best way?

Hey, rirerire!

I would recommend trying to provide a longer quote first and then narrow it down to those specific words you wish to analyse. This can allow the marker to see that you know the text in greater depth but that you also wish to magnify its details in your analysis. With this example, you might write something like this to integrate the textual evidence organically.

"Chong illustrates the depth of her cultural memories of the titular mooncakes through 'the deep orange yolks, leaving half-round cavities.' This is sensationalised through the gustatory imagery that accompanies the yolks, described as 'creamy' and 'salty' to allow readers to further share and engage with the poet's depicted, sensory experience."

If you're in doubt, try to use longer quotes first in the exam and you might choose to come back at the end if you have time left to add some shorter ones as extra detail  :) This can enable you to focus first on getting the main examples you want to use down and any additional things you can remember that might elevate your response further. Hope this helps!

Angelina  ;D
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