Login

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

December 01, 2022, 01:26:16 pm

Author Topic: Doublespeak Examples  (Read 3873 times)  Share 

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

CoreyW

  • Fresh Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Respect: 0
Doublespeak Examples
« on: September 20, 2017, 07:39:26 pm »
0
Hi all,
Im having some trouble of finding recent specific examples of double speak for my Essays. If anyone om has any recent and relevant examples, please comment them for me.
Thank you!

EulerFan102

  • Forum Regular
  • **
  • Posts: 75
  • Respect: +53
Re: Doublespeak Examples
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2017, 09:29:53 pm »
+3
Hi all,
Im having some trouble of finding recent specific examples of double speak for my Essays. If anyone om has any recent and relevant examples, please comment them for me.
Thank you!

Hey Corey,

There's plenty of examples out there. A good place to start is searching 'doublespeak Australia' in Google News and seeing if anything there is appropriate. Here are four examples that I've found recently, all from Australia and from 2017:

 • ‘When asked to explain in “the simplest language” the challenge of energy security Turnbull responded: “Well our goal is to ensure that energy is reliable, that the lights go on when you flick the switch. It’s affordable, that households and businesses can pay for it and that we meet our emissions targets.” No hesitation, no doubt, no jargon and no waffle.’ (Dennis Shanahan, ‘Malcolm Turnbull ditches the jargon and the waffle’, The Australian, 15 February 2017)
 • ‘There are many reasons why fly-fishing has lost popularity. I believe a main one is the mysticism that seems to surround the sport, which attracts more than its share of eccentrics. Some people like to portray fly-fishing as an art form, which it isn’t, and bury the reality behind a veil of technical jargon and double-speak.’ (Steve Cooper, ‘Time to fly’, Sports Hounds, 9 September 2017)
 • ‘Australia Post protested that revealing the size of the managerial swag-bag might mean people would “become targets for unwarranted media attention”. It also griped that making the bulging pay packets public could “lead to brand damage for Australia Post”. This is corporate double-speak writ large.’ (Carl Rhodes, ‘Australia Post salary scandal highlights our nation’s growing wage inequality’, The Conversation, 10 February 2017)
 • ‘You rarely hear Australian politicians use the “T” word — Taxes. They’re too fond of jargon and euphemism to disguise what they really mean, and make it appear more palatable to voters. Taxes, charges and cuts have become such taboo words, MPs invent utter drivel to circumnavigate the plain English equivalents. Education Minister Simon Birmingham recently used the obfuscating jargon “efficiency levy” to describe unpopular university funding cuts.’ (Gary Nunn, ‘Pollies, give plain English a try. We're smarter than you think’, the Daily Telegraph, 14 June 2017)

Hope these help  ;D

betsyjolas

  • Fresh Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Respect: 0
Re: Doublespeak Examples
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2022, 04:49:57 pm »
0
For example, when you hear politicians say things like “I am for doubling down on research” or “We must double down on our support for local communities” they are using double speak. This practice of speaking cryptically or ambiguously is meant to confuse an audience and can be extremely effective at times.wordle