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Coopha

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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #30 on: May 20, 2015, 07:18:54 pm »
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Arcadia by Tom Stoppard
Just wondering if I would be able to get some feedback on this essay. Thanks


Arcadia by Tom Stoppard examines the conflict between Classicist and Romanticist forms of thinking. Stoppard explores the question of whether each form of thinking can exist solitarily or if they can be melded together to exist in harmony.

Stoppard sets his play in two time periods. One is in 1809 and the other in the present day. It is in 1809 that the Enlightenment is yielding to Romanticism. The present day character of Hannah, a historical writer, regards this period as "the decline from thinking to feeling." At the same time in physics a few holes are beginning to appear in the balanced patterns discovered by Newton. In this time period of 1809 a young student named Thomasina longs for science to reach beyond the ordered regularity of geometric shapes and instead wants to tackle what is random and irregular such as the shape of a bluebell "if there is an equation for a curve like a bell than there must be an equation for one like a bluebell"

The idea of classicism and romanticism is a complex one. Stoppard has heightened the complexity and confusion of ideas by setting the play in the two different time periods. For instance, Thomasina deviates from the narrow road of mathematics into the unchartered territory of irregularity. In 1809 this school of thinking would have been regarded as Romantic. However in the present time period Valentine is following Thomasinas same method of maths but he is called a classicist. A new idea is always seen as irregular and disordered therefore romantic. However as time moves on everyone will hold this idea as a truth and it will be seen as ordered, reasonable and therefor classic. Stoppard wants his audience to question when the new modern will take over our own idea of "romantic" because today's classical was once romantic itself.

Stoppard uses characters in present day Sidley Park that embody either Romanticist or Classicist forms of thinking to demonstrate the conflict and chaos that can erupt as a result of these ideals colliding together. The present day character of Valentine is a classicist relying on order and equations to seek the independent truth. His counterpart is Bernard a Romanticist who jeers at Valentines quest for the abstract truth and argues that the process and journey of obtaining truth is more important than the the truth itself.     

In a heated discussion between Valentine and Bernard the crack between these two ideals becomes a ravine, an abyss as both characters represent their ideology as black and white. They are ideologues who stand by their way of thinking seeing no middle ground, closing the door to some truths.

Valentine sparks the heated discussion by directly challenging Bernard's idea that personalities are important in the scope of history. Valentine calls personalities trivial but discovery of the independent truth of higher importance.
 "What matters Is the calculus. Scientific progress. Knowledge." 
Bernard immediately rejects this theory saying " I can think of nothing more trivial than the speed of light" Bernard's belief is that the knowledge of lights speed doesn't say anything about being human as we can't touch or experience the speed of light.

Bernard says to valentine " zap me with penicillin and pesticides and I'll spare you the bomb and aerosols." This satirical statement is in response to Valentines confident one that scientific progress is more important than personalities. Bernard forms a humanitarian argument that knowledge of helpful inventions like penicillin and pesticides are canceled out by their evil counterparts like bombs and aerosols. Bernard is proving his opinion that a classical world is not a harmonious one as scientific truth will kill us. He states that " progress is not perfectibility" that in terms of being human these transcendent truths were only bringing us closer to an imperfect society and farther from the essence of what it is to be human.

Valentine in contrast is a classicist. He has set himself the humble task of finding the mathematical equation that can predict a population of grouse. Valentine accepts that randomness or "noise" is as much a part of reality as order. " real data is messy....very hard to spot the tune" Valentine then goes on to say that the way the " unpredictable and the predetermined unfold together to make everything the way it is......it make me so happy" Valentine likes the mystery of the unknown. The endless possibilities that the future could take, that one equation could never predict every aspect of ones life. He says "it's the best possible time to be alive, when almost everything you thought you knew was wrong. This was due to the chaos theory. However the cause of valentines happiness also causes him to become frustrated and angry.
Valentine "I've given up on grouse"
Hannah "Why?"
Valentine " too much noise. Too much bloody noise."
Despite Valentines appreciation of the random nature of the future he becomes frustrated because he cannot see the truth within something so seemingly simple. The simplest of inconsistencies compound to become larger until the truth is no longer visible through the noise.


Classicism and Romanticism themselves hold no flaws but it is the characters who represent the ideologies who are flawed. Bernard accuses classicists as potentially trying to discover the rules by which the Divine Creater himself worked. He therefore calls classicists arrogant for attempting to do this. This is ironical as we are taught by Stoppard to view Bernard as the arrogant character. We are constantly reminded that the basis of Bernard's knowledge is all a lie. Stoppard also breaks up Bernard's almost intelligent conversations with a shallow minded comment in between. " we were quite happy with Aristotle's Cosmos"  Bernard likes the idea of the earth being the centre of the universe and this is indicative of his arrogance. He also says "how did you con us out of all that status? All that money?" Bernard's ulterior motive is to gain fame and fortune, not consistent with the true Romanticist quest for self discovery. His only focus is on self knowledge which is internal and never external and this can lead to arrogance.

Stoppard represents Valentine as a more likeable character. He is on no quest to find the equation for the future.  He has a humble aim of predicting the grouse population. However valentine struggles to comprehend that Thomasina as a young child could come up with the same maths as him more than 100 earlier. Valentine can almost see the empirical truth but his arrogance clouds his vision making it impossible for valentine to keep it in his grasp.Valentine instability is seen at the conclusion of the play when he turns to alcohol as a source of absolution.


Stoppard is trying to show his audience that the abyss between Romanticism and Classicism can be crossed. Although one might think of themselves as only possessing one of these ideologies a person possesses both of them. It is like one circle of a Venn Diagram. A person may posses predominantly one form of thinking but instead of an abyss between them there is a space that allows the harmonious intermingling of ideologies. Stoppard is trying to show that life that cannot be lived within the confines of just one ideology. It is necessary that a person has both within them as to move forward in both thought and emotion. Even if the discovery of the art or science in themselves is purely accidental, every human uses both Classicism and Romanicism to reach an understanding of both themselves and the world they live in.
 

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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #31 on: June 02, 2015, 06:59:46 pm »
+1
I just took a brief read - I'm going to lay out some issues for you.

 - There's not much analysis. You do a lot of 'telling' and giving background information. This is unnecessary.
 - There is a lack of flow. It is fine to move to different ideas, but I get the sensation that I'm reading a lot of paragraphs, written separately, being copied and pasted into a jumbled order.
 - Your analysis isn't the analysis Lit is looking for. You need to talk about how the quote (or whatever evidence you use) achieves a particular purpose. E.g. 'the lilting cadence of 'xxx' in line 5 creates a movement to the line, propelling its pace' or 'the use of conjectural imagery reflects 'author's' inability to maintain a firmly grounded framework'
 - There are random sentences that don't belong. 'it is like one circle of a venn diagram' <- that is not appropriate.

I'm running out of time so that's all I'll leave for now. I might come back later.
Read a couple of the earlier submissions to help you build your work. EZ's work is great.
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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #32 on: June 06, 2015, 10:09:23 pm »
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In Cold Blood - Truman Capote
Unfortunately, I cannot provide the passages. I would really appreciate some feedback!

Across passage 1, Capote employs the town of Holcomb as a microcosm of American life and visualises the destruction of social structures in the wake of the Clutter murders. Envisioning the “shallow horror” of the “frightened gossips, mostly male”, Capote seeks to convey the subversion of social norms. By having males engage in an activity commonly associated with women, Capote intends to indicate the magnitude of the Clutter murders; that which dissolves the standards upholding Holcomb and unveils the true nature of its citizens. Furthermore, the connotations of “cold” used to supplement the “shallow” response enforces the community’s detachment to the nature of the murders of themselves. Rather, Holcomb’s inhabitants are moved by the ideological implications of the crime – its destruction of individual utopia and the seeming imperviousness of the American Dream. With Postmistress Clare’s assertion that “everyone was… talking all kinds of wild-eyed stuff”, it is evident that the inhabitants of Holcomb have been torn from their mental moorings; they are, as implicit throughout passage 1, striving to mask the situation’s true horror through ambiguous language such as “pulling a stunt” and “maybe”. The use of “kind of wondering!” professes an evident aversion to confronting reality directly. Capote enforces here that the inhabitants of Holcomb have been thrust into an environment of perceived duplicity and distrust. In the grander context of the novel, this suspicion becomes an overarching motif that comes to characterise the collective society of America, thus resulting in Perry and Dick’s deaths.

However, via Mrs Hartman’s “candour” in passage 1, Capote permits the reader to the seemingly unspoken sentiments of Holcomb’s inhabitants. The slang utilised by Hartman in “sure took the fly out of me”, suggests that she was once aloof with her comfortable naivety, and further positions her as a bastion of rural values. The realisation herein, culminating in Clare’s rhetorical question “then who’s safe, I ask you?” signifies an enlightenment that redefines the social constructs of Holcomb. As referenced earlier in the novel, Holcomb’s people once relished in the liberty of unlocked doors and sleeping in the dark. On one level, Clare’s inquisition appears to elucidate that the sensationalism of the act has altered significantly a society established upon the pursuit of the American Dream. However, on another, it impugns the invincibility of this ideology, thereby signifying the deterioration of the façade upheld by the utopian Clutters. The italicised and thus emphasised utterance of “couldn’t” in passage 3 evokes a similar incredulousness in Dewey, who assumes that Mr. Clutter, the epitome of the American Dream, “would have fought [back]” in defence of “Bonnie’s life” and the “lives of his children”. Herein lies Capote’s criticism of the pleasing veneer of the American Dream – one that fails to fulfil the beliefs of Holcomb’s inhabitants. With Dewey’s projection having not aligned with Herb’s actions during the murders, Capote delineates humanity and its assumption of the American Dream as one that champions a constant infallibility within its practitioners.

On the contrary, Capote recognises that society’s deference to social norms are ultimately injurious to their evaluation of the mentally ill. As Marie peruses the “mug-shots” in passage 2, Capote applies a grotesque juxtaposition between Perry’s “moist, dreamy” eyes and the barbaric nature of the crime. Herein, Perry’s perspective on the world is realised; that which is viewed through clouded lens of quixotic dreams. As Capote proceeds to contrast Perry’s character with Dick’s, to which Marie associates with a “bobcat… eyes radiant with pain and hatred”, and whose eyes are “forbiddingly ‘criminal’” the reader apprehends the bestial nature of this man. However, bearing the descriptions of both men in mind, Capote strives to engender sympathy for Perry, whose heightened self-awareness and “ironic, erratic compassion” in passage 3 signifies a true – albeit stunted – connection to his own humanity. Hence, Capote observes the limitless complexity of humanity, conceding that within the most depraved individuals there exist moments of charitableness.

In a similar vein, Perry’s realisation of the absurdity of the murders in passage 3 points to the irrationality of striving towards the American Dream. Fraught with pithy sentences, Perry’s admission to have been “sick” and “disgusted” with his primitive behaviour envisions the manipulation of envy. The dichotomy between “rich man” and “child’s silver” establishes, on a grander level, the hierarchy upheld by the American Dream; Perry is, as is seen here, deigning to the level of this insignificant currency, thereby inhabiting his subordinated position within society. In another sense, however, Perry is emulating Dick, who Capote described to be “serpentine”, by “crawling on his belly”. Herein, Capote envisions the grotesque transformations of Perry’s character elicited by the allure of the American Dream. This contrasts with the Capote’s physical depictions of Perry in passage 2, encapsulated in language such as “peculiar refinement”, which establishes an unalloyed visage of his character. Furthermore, the overarching futility of Perry’s actions in passage 3 marks the ever-retreating hope for attaining the ability to exercise his dreams. Thus, as it appears, Capote examines the human condition under the guile of the prospects of wealth and how this can be corrupted by the vices of society.

Building upon this, by depicting Dewey as “emaciated”, Capote envisions the development of a societal malaise. Employing Dewey's wife as an emblem of society, Capote addresses the stigmatism that arises from a “[bad] state of mind”. On one level, Marie’s anxiety regarding her husband’s health encapsulates a humanly instinctive nature to express concern towards a loved one; however, on another, it unveils her realisation that her husband’s societal position is now jeopardised. Dewey’s transformed persona of passage 3 does not exhibit such qualities, embodying a relentless curiosity and a reprisal of his persona at the outset of his investigation. Thus, Capote illustrates the fulfilment of Dewey’s purpose through his ameliorated physical and mental condition in passage 3. Conversely, Perry’s decline from the haughty persona in the mug shot of passage 2 to the dishevelled figure of passage 3, realises the prevailing nature of the American justice system: one that esteems the affluent and the illustrious and disregards the economically defeated. It is apparent that Perry’s efforts to attain societal place are futile, contrasting with Dewey and Hartman of passage 1. With the eventual executions of Perry and Dick, the reader finally apprehends the insidious nature of American society and its marginalisation of the mentally deranged. For Capote, Perry and Dick’s executions mark the culmination of American ignorance, positing that a society domineered by the American Dream is inherently unwitting, so staunchly fixated on self-preservation, that it forgets the value of humanity itself.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2015, 10:17:46 pm by That Other Guy »
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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #33 on: June 08, 2015, 02:08:03 pm »
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Hi!
Could someone please give me feedback on the little paragraph I did?

Adrian Hyland - Kinglake 350

The passage is an excerpt from Snapshots, Adrian Hyland's Kinglake 350. It narrates the family of Drew Barr and Angie OÇonnor escaping from the fire front that has passed their home.

"Only home the kids have ever known" allude to the loss of identity and sense of belonging the children suffered as they watched their home burn down to the ground, and "Grace burns her hand..."depict the endurance the children withstood while confronting emotional trauma and physical injuries. The pains afflicted to those who are weaker members of society such as children and animal are prominent in this passage. "Cows up against fences" are strong imagery which create a desperate scene where livestock have struggled to escape the confinements of their little home in order to flee away from the fire front. "Gaping mouths"and "beseeching eyes"are highly emotional language that create a picture of unimaginable pain that animals have had to endure - members of the society who were simply ignored for being less valuable than human lives. What Hyland laments is the lack of attention towards the weaker members of the society- before, during and after the Black Saturday, and their subsequent suffering because of the adults who were meant to act responsibly. Beyond this, Hyland criticises our innate instinct to ignore possibilities of ill-fortune and hope for the best circumstances, for the sake of others that depend on us.

Thanks! It's really crappy :P Please criticise, I feel like I need it :P

Thank you guys (:
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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #34 on: October 30, 2015, 04:10:47 pm »
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I only did one Para, but if anyone could mark it, it would be much appreciated.

Jane’s statement, ‘I desired liberty; for liberty I gasped; for liberty I uttered a prayer,’ within excerpt two reveals her ‘desperate’ yearning for liberation and freedom- an escape from the restrictions of Lowood. As she describes the ‘boundary’ of Lowood which renders her an ‘exile’ within its ‘prison-ground’; Bronte reveals the restriction that Lowood placed upon Jane, isolating her from the ‘real world’ and rendering her a prisoner within its confines. Within passage two, Jane ‘trace the white road winding round the… mountain’ which she ‘longed to follow’; Bronte expresses Jane’s strong desire for freedom. The road is seen ‘vanishing’ in a gorge; Jane cannot know where such a road may take her, yet still yearns after ‘change, [a] stimulus’. Bronte reveals that Jane is not afraid of the unknown, of ‘life amidst [the world’s] perils’, a notion which directly contradicts how women were expected to behave within 19th century patriarchal society, in living a life sheltered and dependent upon their husbands.

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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #35 on: November 02, 2015, 04:08:56 pm »
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I've written for the Lit Exam 2014 on Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf... Is it too much trouble if someone could look at an excerpt?

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Edward Albee:

... George is quickly distracted by the implications of Martha revealing their secret. He speaks, "more or less to himself"and to an absent Martha, "as if she were in the room", "... you goddamn destructive..." In his distraction, his affable facade drops; when Honey says, "Oh, it's so late..." implicitly asking to leave, George responds, "nastily" and obliquely brings up the fact that Nick and Honey should have, but do not have children. This is one of the ways that Albee shows the artifice inherent in his character's behaviours. By having George preoccupied, his true opinion of the guests is shown and contrasted with his displayed attitude of being a gracious host. This is a statement on the artificial society that people build in their face-to-face interactions, of civility and pleasantries, and how no one is exempt from the dishonesty; in fact, everyone is expected to participate in the dishonesty, because a world of perpetual truth is regarded as distasteful and chaotic.
...

Nick is shown attempting to apologise, saying, "Honey... baby... I'm sorry... I didn't mean to...", a display that George observes "with some disgust". When confronted by Nick, he says, "I hate hypocrisy", which is a comment on the fundamental defining aspect of Nick's character, beyond his worldly success- Nick is a hypocrite. Nick is someone who will do or say anything to get ahead- evidence in his forced apology to Honey, which he doesn't mean, as illustrated with his outburst at George- ".... DAMAGING! TO ME!!" in response to George's flippant, "she'll recover." He regrets the injury to his relationship with his wife, not that his wife is hurt- and by repeatedly emphasising Nick's success and George's failure, the play conflates success with lies and hypocrisy. To effectively reach the "American Dream" of the 1950s is to renounce the truth.
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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #36 on: February 14, 2016, 05:58:18 pm »
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Hey...can someone please mark my essay- it's going to be an in-class essay so it might not turn up exactly like this...i just did this for practice
it's an essay on belonging by Tim Winton...it doesn't have a conclusion yet...we were given the text and told that we had to do a close reading on it...so here is something i through together to make it a bit easier to do when we get the actual question tomorrow- we get 50 mins to write it if that helps in any way...i feel like there is something wrong with it- maybe the way it flows? anyway i'd appreciate any help  :)

Tim Winton’s collection of short stories, The Turning, highlight the proposition that in every person’s life, there are moments of pivotal importance that will ultimately shape where that person will go and who they will become. These ‘turnings’ and epiphany’s are catalyzed by events in one’s life, relating to moments, people, places and time. Winton introduces his collection with ‘Big World’. A story, that even in it’s title remains true to this concept. The story opens with the end of highschool for an unnamed narrator and his best friend, Biggie. The story then follows the pair as they leave their town, escaping the disappointment of their exam results. At the heart of this story lies perhaps the most central and oldest feeling one experiences; belonging. Winton cleverly covers all aspects of belonging, highlighting the importance of one understanding themselves, explaining the fragility of relationships and their effect, and, in-turn utiliseing this to acceptance to form meaningful friendships.

Big World by Tim Winton shows that an individual’s understanding about themselves provides them with a sense of belonging. Belonging is shown to be a desire for social bonds that provide an individual with a sense of safety and comfort, a theme prevalent in Big World. Upon the completion of high-school, the narrator reflects on the days proceeding the exam-period, expressing his disappointment in his results and the unhappy situation he finds himself in. At the outset, the persona establishes a negative connotation in the tedious routine of work , which is conveyed in the use of short sentences, “The job mostly consists of hosing blood off the floors” and further accentuated by, ‘Some days I can see biggie and me out there on old codgers, anchored to the friggin place, stuck forever…’ These sentence alone expresses the persona’s unhappiness and sense of detachment from the situation he finds himself in.  In the third paragraph, high modality is used in “That I dream of escaping, of pissing off north to find some blue sky” to accentuate that the persona has a deep sense of understanding about himself and the place he will belong to. He supports this by further exclaiming, in reference to his friend, ‘Unlike him, I’m not really from here’. A change to positive atmosphere is achieved when he visits Perth in the visual imagery “the air was soupy, salty” and oral imagery “birds in the mint scented scrub all round”. The simile in “nervous and giggly like a pair of tipsy travellers” stresses that he belongs to Perth and it gives him a sense of personality. However, even this sense of connection is short lived as the fire metaphorically burns this idea and audiences are forwarded to a time of bleakness. The persona proceeds to relate the effect of the fire with his view of the world, “The sky goes all acid blue and there’s just this huge silence. It’s like the world’s stop”. The lines that proceed then describe a bleak future of alienation. In this way, Big World’, illustrates a vital aspect o belonging; an understanding about themselves and the world around them to belong.
 Big World also shows that relationships are essential to belonging. This is expressed in the persona’s friendship with Biggie, which provides him with a sense of security and means of overcoming obstacles in life. This is expressed in the bullying the persona encountered by Tony Macoli and that Biggie saved him from it. Winton highlights that healthy relationships do not only provide companionship but also safety, security and satisfaction. The juxtaposition of Biggie and Tony Macoli in “Biggie became my mate, my constant companion, and Tony Macoli was suddenly landscape” explains that to belong, a healthy relationship is needed. The persona explains that Biggie helped him overcome the news of his horrid exam results as “the ache is still there inside me but this is the best I’ve felt since the news about the exams”. Thus, a healthy relationship is essential to belonging and provides individuals with a sense of security and satisfaction.

Paralleling a complementary notion, Tim Winton highlights on his theme of belonging, by acknowledging the very heart of it; a strong sense of mateship.  Through the repetition of the phrase, “Biggie and me”, Winton focuses on the strong bond between the two protagonists and emphasizes on the theme of mateship, which lurks in the story. The positive connotation is evident in the way the persona describes Biggie, Biggie’s not the brightest crayon in the box but he’s the most loyal person I know’, displaying the respect and love the persona has for his best friend. However, although there is a strong sense of mateship, the fragile nature of friendship is also embedded within the story, as shown through the informal phrase, “To be honest, he’s not my sort of bloke at all, but somehow he’s my best mate”.  This goes to reveal that although the persona and Biggie are friends, their friendship is based on the persona “feeling somehow senior and secure in himself”, openly admitting that he enjoys, ‘being brighter, being a step ahead’. These quotes point out the contradiction of friendship and how even the closest form of friendship has a fragility and a price; further supported by the statement ‘Friendship comes at a price…’ and explaining that ‘there have been girl’s I’ve disqualified myself from because of Biggie’.  Through these opposing aspects of friendship and belonging, Winton portrays the idea of belonging in a new light by presenting that an aspect of belonging will also encompass a knowledge of how fragile the relationships that make one feel safe and secure are.
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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #37 on: February 14, 2016, 08:35:44 pm »
+3
Tim Winton’s collection of short stories, The Turning, highlight the proposition that in every person’s life, there are moments of pivotal importance that will ultimately shape where that person will go and who they will become. These ‘turnings’ and epiphany’s are catalyzed by events in one’s life, relating to moments, people, places and time. Winton introduces his collection with ‘Big World’. A story, that even in it’s title remains true to this concept. The story opens with the end of highschool for an unnamed narrator and his best friend, Biggie. The story then follows the pair as they leave their town, escaping the disappointment of their exam results. You want to avoid story telling in Literature at all costs. This adds nothing to your analysis and only shows that you know what the plot is. At the heart of this story lies perhaps the most central and oldest feeling one experiences; belonging. Winton cleverly covers all aspects of belonging, highlighting the importance of one understanding themselves, explaining the fragility of relationships and their effect, and, in-turn utiliseing this to acceptance to form meaningful friendshipsIt would be nice if you could utilise some embedded quotes from the text to support this section as it shows you are working with the language of the text rather than listing themes

For your introduction I would also consider adding in some comments on views and values: this is something about what Winton himself values in relation to the ideas that you have brought up, or something about the context of the era in which the short stories are set / context of Tim Winton's Australian society

Big World by Tim Winton shows that an individual’s understanding about themselves provides them with a sense of belonging. Belonging is shown to be a desire for social bonds that provide an individual with a sense of safety and comfort, a theme prevalent in Big World. No need for a definition of belonging, also try to avoid reducing the text to themes. Rather than talking about the vague idea of 'belonging', you might want to introduce the ideas as being 'the social pressure to conform' or the 'search for a meaningful identity in a conformist, routine world' Upon the completion of high-school, the narrator reflects on the days proceeding the exam-period, expressing his disappointment in his results and the unhappy situation he finds himself in. Try to remove storytelling, notice how you can just delete this whole sentence and start with your next sentence without losing any analysis AtFrom the outset, the persona establishes a negative connotation in the tedious routine of work This could be phrased better as it doesn't flow too well. Also rather than 'the persona' it might be more accurate to say that 'Winton establishes etcetc', which is conveyed in through the use of short sentences, “The job mostly consists of hosing blood off the floors” and further accentuated by, ‘Some days I can see biggie and me out there on old codgers, anchored to the friggin place, stuck forever…’ These sentence alone expresses the persona’s unhappiness and sense of detachment from the situation he finds himself in.  In the third paragraph, high modality is used in “That I dream of escaping, of pissing off north to find some blue sky” to accentuate that the persona has a deep sense of understanding about himself and the place he will belong to. He supports this by further exclaiming, in reference to his friend, ‘Unlike him, I’m not really from here’. Here it seems you are talking about the theme of 'belonging' but you are not really giving any broader analysis of your idea. You want to discuss how this dissatisfaction is relevant to society or the context of these short stories or to Winton himself A change to positive atmosphere is achieved when he visits Perth in the visual imagery “the air was soupy, salty” Perfect opportunity to discuss the minutae of language here: notice the alliteration of soupy and salty. Depending on the rest of the quote, you can also discuss maybe how the short phrases give the writing an ethereal quality, perhaps contrasting against the drudgery of his mundane worldand oral imagery “birds in the mint scented scrub all round”. The simile in “nervous and giggly like a pair of tipsy travellers” Once again you want to discuss the specifics of the language, the alliteration of the 't' sound in tipsy travellers, the lighthearted affect of the repeated 'g' sound and 't' sound and how that accentuates what is being conveyed in the similestresses that he belongs to Perth and it gives him a sense of personality. However, even this sense of connection is short lived as the fire metaphorically burns this idea and audiences are forwarded to a time of bleakness. The persona proceeds to relate the effect of the fire with his view of the world Cut out storytelling. Instead use a short clause such as: The persona's recollection etcetc, “The sky goes all acid blue and there’s just this huge silence. It’s like the world’s stop”. The lines that proceed then describe a bleak future of alienation. Try and support with quotes: even inserting one word quotes into a sentence can add more weight to your assertion In this way, Big World’, illustrates a vital aspect of belonging; an understanding about themselves and the world around them to belong.Have you really shown this though. It seems like the start and end of your paragraph are meant to be connected, but you haven't given enough discussion of your evidence to fully support your wider idea.
 Big World also shows that relationships are essential to belonging. This is expressed in the persona’s friendship with Biggie, which provides him with a sense of security and means of overcoming obstacles in life. This is expressed Avoid using the same phrase so close together as it makes your writing less fluent in the bullying the persona encountered by Tony Macoli and that Biggie saved him from itYou need quotes otherwise this is basically just storytelling. Winton highlights that healthy relationships do not only provide companionship but also safety, security and satisfaction. Quotes / Evidence? The juxtaposition of Biggie and Tony Macoli in “Biggie became my mate, my constant companion, and Tony Macoli was suddenly landscape” explains that to belong, a healthy relationship is needed. The persona explains that Biggie helped him overcome the news of his horrid exam results as “the ache is still there inside me but this is the best I’ve felt since the news about the exams”. Thus, a healthy relationship is essential to belonging and provides individuals with a sense of security and satisfaction. The analysis here seems a little superficial and I would like to see some closer analysis of the language

Paralleling a complementary notion, Tim Winton highlights on his theme of belonging, by acknowledging the very heart of it; a strong sense of mateship.  Through the repetition of the phrase, “Biggie and me”, Winton focuses Good: close analysis of the writing techniques and the intent of the authoron the strong bond between the two protagonists and emphasizes on the theme of mateship, which lurks in the story Try to avoid just talking about 'mateship' as a broad theme but focus on some more specific idea around mateship . The positive connotation is evident in the way the persona describes Biggie, Biggie’s not the brightest crayon in the box but he’s the most loyal person I know’, displaying the respect and love the persona has for his best friend Some extra analysis: maybe how the light insult 'not the brightest...' actually demonstrates that these two characters are close friends. However, although there is a strong sense of mateship, the fragile nature of friendship is also embedded within the story, as shown through the informal phrase, “To be honest, he’s not my sort of bloke at all, but somehow he’s my best mate”.  This goes to reveal that although the persona and Biggie are friends, their friendship is based on the persona “feeling somehow senior and secure in himself”, openly admitting that he enjoys, ‘being brighter, being a step ahead’. These quotes point out the contradiction of friendship and how even the closest form of friendship has a fragility and a price; further supported by the statement ‘Friendship comes at a price…’ You can probably just integrate this quote in your previous sentence like this: the closest form of friendship has a fragility and 'comes at a price'. and explaining that ‘there have been girl’s I’ve disqualified myself from because of Biggie’. What does this revelation mean, when you give these kinds of quotes, you have to analyse them Through these opposing aspects of friendship and belonging, Winton portrays the idea of belonging in a new light by presenting that an aspect of belonging will also encompass a knowledge of how fragile the relationships that make one feel safe and secure are.

Overall, you have very solid ideas and its obvious you understand your text quite well. The analysis especially at the end uses more quotes and has a specific idea in mind (the fragility of friendships that we value) which is what you should be striving for.There are a couple of things that you should be focusing on:

  • More close analysis of the language: This is what separates Lit from English. You need to  always be identifying how the rhythm, rhyming, alliteration etc contribute towards the meaning of the text. It is not enough to just state that these techniques exist, you need to analyse their effect and why the author chooses to use them
  • More acknowledgement of Winton as the author of the text: how is the text influenced by Winton's values and society. Maybe about how this story is distinctly Australian
  • Less focus on broad themes such as 'belonging', especially in the topic sentences. I notice that you narrow down in your body paragraphs, but you want to be immediately starting with the a specific idea rather than a broad theme.
  • Cut out storytelling, this adds little to the analysis and anyone who has read the book (your teacher and examiners) will find storytelling redundant

If you have any questions, feel free to ask! Sorry if this sounded a bit harsh since I'm being quite nitpicky in some areas.

Maz

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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #38 on: February 14, 2016, 09:26:24 pm »
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Tim Winton’s collection of short stories, The Turning, highlight the proposition that in every person’s life, there are moments of pivotal importance that will ultimately shape where that person will go and who they will become. These ‘turnings’ and epiphany’s are catalyzed by events in one’s life, relating to moments, people, places and time. Winton introduces his collection with ‘Big World’. A story, that even in it’s title remains true to this concept. The story opens with the end of highschool for an unnamed narrator and his best friend, Biggie. The story then follows the pair as they leave their town, escaping the disappointment of their exam results. You want to avoid story telling in Literature at all costs. This adds nothing to your analysis and only shows that you know what the plot is. At the heart of this story lies perhaps the most central and oldest feeling one experiences; belonging. Winton cleverly covers all aspects of belonging, highlighting the importance of one understanding themselves, explaining the fragility of relationships and their effect, and, in-turn utiliseing this to acceptance to form meaningful friendshipsIt would be nice if you could utilise some embedded quotes from the text to support this section as it shows you are working with the language of the text rather than listing themes

For your introduction I would also consider adding in some comments on views and values: this is something about what Winton himself values in relation to the ideas that you have brought up, or something about the context of the era in which the short stories are set / context of Tim Winton's Australian society

Big World by Tim Winton shows that an individual’s understanding about themselves provides them with a sense of belonging. Belonging is shown to be a desire for social bonds that provide an individual with a sense of safety and comfort, a theme prevalent in Big World. No need for a definition of belonging, also try to avoid reducing the text to themes. Rather than talking about the vague idea of 'belonging', you might want to introduce the ideas as being 'the social pressure to conform' or the 'search for a meaningful identity in a conformist, routine world' Upon the completion of high-school, the narrator reflects on the days proceeding the exam-period, expressing his disappointment in his results and the unhappy situation he finds himself in. Try to remove storytelling, notice how you can just delete this whole sentence and start with your next sentence without losing any analysis AtFrom the outset, the persona establishes a negative connotation in the tedious routine of work This could be phrased better as it doesn't flow too well. Also rather than 'the persona' it might be more accurate to say that 'Winton establishes etcetc', which is conveyed in through the use of short sentences, “The job mostly consists of hosing blood off the floors” and further accentuated by, ‘Some days I can see biggie and me out there on old codgers, anchored to the friggin place, stuck forever…’ These sentence alone expresses the persona’s unhappiness and sense of detachment from the situation he finds himself in.  In the third paragraph, high modality is used in “That I dream of escaping, of pissing off north to find some blue sky” to accentuate that the persona has a deep sense of understanding about himself and the place he will belong to. He supports this by further exclaiming, in reference to his friend, ‘Unlike him, I’m not really from here’. Here it seems you are talking about the theme of 'belonging' but you are not really giving any broader analysis of your idea. You want to discuss how this dissatisfaction is relevant to society or the context of these short stories or to Winton himself A change to positive atmosphere is achieved when he visits Perth in the visual imagery “the air was soupy, salty” Perfect opportunity to discuss the minutae of language here: notice the alliteration of soupy and salty. Depending on the rest of the quote, you can also discuss maybe how the short phrases give the writing an ethereal quality, perhaps contrasting against the drudgery of his mundane worldand oral imagery “birds in the mint scented scrub all round”. The simile in “nervous and giggly like a pair of tipsy travellers” Once again you want to discuss the specifics of the language, the alliteration of the 't' sound in tipsy travellers, the lighthearted affect of the repeated 'g' sound and 't' sound and how that accentuates what is being conveyed in the similestresses that he belongs to Perth and it gives him a sense of personality. However, even this sense of connection is short lived as the fire metaphorically burns this idea and audiences are forwarded to a time of bleakness. The persona proceeds to relate the effect of the fire with his view of the world Cut out storytelling. Instead use a short clause such as: The persona's recollection etcetc, “The sky goes all acid blue and there’s just this huge silence. It’s like the world’s stop”. The lines that proceed then describe a bleak future of alienation. Try and support with quotes: even inserting one word quotes into a sentence can add more weight to your assertion In this way, Big World’, illustrates a vital aspect of belonging; an understanding about themselves and the world around them to belong.Have you really shown this though. It seems like the start and end of your paragraph are meant to be connected, but you haven't given enough discussion of your evidence to fully support your wider idea.
 Big World also shows that relationships are essential to belonging. This is expressed in the persona’s friendship with Biggie, which provides him with a sense of security and means of overcoming obstacles in life. This is expressed Avoid using the same phrase so close together as it makes your writing less fluent in the bullying the persona encountered by Tony Macoli and that Biggie saved him from itYou need quotes otherwise this is basically just storytelling. Winton highlights that healthy relationships do not only provide companionship but also safety, security and satisfaction. Quotes / Evidence? The juxtaposition of Biggie and Tony Macoli in “Biggie became my mate, my constant companion, and Tony Macoli was suddenly landscape” explains that to belong, a healthy relationship is needed. The persona explains that Biggie helped him overcome the news of his horrid exam results as “the ache is still there inside me but this is the best I’ve felt since the news about the exams”. Thus, a healthy relationship is essential to belonging and provides individuals with a sense of security and satisfaction. The analysis here seems a little superficial and I would like to see some closer analysis of the language

Paralleling a complementary notion, Tim Winton highlights on his theme of belonging, by acknowledging the very heart of it; a strong sense of mateship.  Through the repetition of the phrase, “Biggie and me”, Winton focuses Good: close analysis of the writing techniques and the intent of the authoron the strong bond between the two protagonists and emphasizes on the theme of mateship, which lurks in the story Try to avoid just talking about 'mateship' as a broad theme but focus on some more specific idea around mateship . The positive connotation is evident in the way the persona describes Biggie, Biggie’s not the brightest crayon in the box but he’s the most loyal person I know’, displaying the respect and love the persona has for his best friend Some extra analysis: maybe how the light insult 'not the brightest...' actually demonstrates that these two characters are close friends. However, although there is a strong sense of mateship, the fragile nature of friendship is also embedded within the story, as shown through the informal phrase, “To be honest, he’s not my sort of bloke at all, but somehow he’s my best mate”.  This goes to reveal that although the persona and Biggie are friends, their friendship is based on the persona “feeling somehow senior and secure in himself”, openly admitting that he enjoys, ‘being brighter, being a step ahead’. These quotes point out the contradiction of friendship and how even the closest form of friendship has a fragility and a price; further supported by the statement ‘Friendship comes at a price…’ You can probably just integrate this quote in your previous sentence like this: the closest form of friendship has a fragility and 'comes at a price'. and explaining that ‘there have been girl’s I’ve disqualified myself from because of Biggie’. What does this revelation mean, when you give these kinds of quotes, you have to analyse them Through these opposing aspects of friendship and belonging, Winton portrays the idea of belonging in a new light by presenting that an aspect of belonging will also encompass a knowledge of how fragile the relationships that make one feel safe and secure are.

Overall, you have very solid ideas and its obvious you understand your text quite well. The analysis especially at the end uses more quotes and has a specific idea in mind (the fragility of friendships that we value) which is what you should be striving for.There are a couple of things that you should be focusing on:

  • More close analysis of the language: This is what separates Lit from English. You need to  always be identifying how the rhythm, rhyming, alliteration etc contribute towards the meaning of the text. It is not enough to just state that these techniques exist, you need to analyse their effect and why the author chooses to use them
  • More acknowledgement of Winton as the author of the text: how is the text influenced by Winton's values and society. Maybe about how this story is distinctly Australian
  • Less focus on broad themes such as 'belonging', especially in the topic sentences. I notice that you narrow down in your body paragraphs, but you want to be immediately starting with the a specific idea rather than a broad theme.
  • Cut out storytelling, this adds little to the analysis and anyone who has read the book (your teacher and examiners) will find storytelling redundant

If you have any questions, feel free to ask! Sorry if this sounded a bit harsh since I'm being quite nitpicky in some areas.

hey
thankyou soooo much for all this editing! just a question as i'm reading through it...i still doing quite understand what to do with the introduction...The story is set in Albany, WA however the whole story is about a friendship and the narrator leaving albany. it is known that Tim Winton always thought of albany as his home town and he loved it...however the narrator is completely the opposite in the sense that he wants to leave.
Iv'e never used quotes before in an introduction- i was wandering how to do it without making it sound like the 'body paragraphs with less evidence'
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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #39 on: February 14, 2016, 09:57:39 pm »
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hey
thankyou soooo much for all this editing! just a question as i'm reading through it...i still doing quite understand what to do with the introduction...The story is set in Albany, WA however the whole story is about a friendship and the narrator leaving albany. it is known that Tim Winton always thought of albany as his home town and he loved it...however the narrator is completely the opposite in the sense that he wants to leave.
Iv'e never used quotes before in an introduction- i was wandering how to do it without making it sound like the 'body paragraphs with less evidence'

Your views and values statement doesn't necessarily have to be about the place itself, but maybe about wider Australian youth and society, or youth dissatisfaction. It can also be about what Winton himself values in life expressed through his writing.

As for the quotes part I'm going to use one of my Introductions as an example

Quote
Defined by absence - ‘shade without form’, ‘shade without colour’ - the ‘hollow men’ of Eliot’s modern 20th century world are dislocated from historical knowledge and unable to attain surety in the present. Oscillating between the banal rituals of ‘a game of chess’ and a paralytic interiority, these isolated poetic subjects have found their voices increasingly ‘quiet’, futile in a  physically depraved world where poetic and social communication has ‘withered’ away. Only in the third passage do these fractured voices coalesce, forced to acknowledge a collective despair that characterises the poet at his most pessimistic and bleak.

Here the quotes are less about analysis, but they are embedded in my sentences.
For example: "where poetic and social communication has ‘withered’ away"
Notice how instead of withered I could have used many other words such as faded or worn or any other synonym. However, the word withered actually appears in Eliot's poem, so I can use it as a quote. I don't actually analyse this quote as this is an introduction, however it shows a close knowledge of the text and that I'm following the language and ideas of the text itself.

The views and values part can be seen in these phrases:
'Eliot’s modern 20th century world'
'that characterises the poet at his most pessimistic and bleak'

Just some acknowledgement of the context / values will make your essay more sophisticated. It also shows you acknowledging the text as not a standalone text but a product of an author, time period and location.

Maz

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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #40 on: February 14, 2016, 10:21:45 pm »
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Your views and values statement doesn't necessarily have to be about the place itself, but maybe about wider Australian youth and society, or youth dissatisfaction. It can also be about what Winton himself values in life expressed through his writing.

As for the quotes part I'm going to use one of my Introductions as an example

Here the quotes are less about analysis, but they are embedded in my sentences.
For example: "where poetic and social communication has ‘withered’ away"
Notice how instead of withered I could have used many other words such as faded or worn or any other synonym. However, the word withered actually appears in Eliot's poem, so I can use it as a quote. I don't actually analyse this quote as this is an introduction, however it shows a close knowledge of the text and that I'm following the language and ideas of the text itself.

The views and values part can be seen in these phrases:
'Eliot’s modern 20th century world'
'that characterises the poet at his most pessimistic and bleak'

Just some acknowledgement of the context / values will make your essay more sophisticated. It also shows you acknowledging the text as not a standalone text but a product of an author, time period and location.

hey
 thank you! again  :D
my essay has now made it to 1200 words...do you think i will be able to write that in 50 mins?
thankyou again
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Maz

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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #41 on: March 28, 2016, 03:33:34 pm »
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Hey, i was wandering if someone could please have a look at my tutorial...i plan on starting by giving some context of what happened around the period it was made- and does anyone have any ideas on how to make it more like a tutorial? i was gonna ask questions from the audience...but i'm not entirely sure what and which to do; however at this stage it is pretty much just an oral. It's on the poem Australia by A.D.Hope
During the period between 1930s-1970s, Australian poet A. D. Hope, compiled a book with his poems, called “Collected Poems’. Amongst that collection was the poem Australia, though the exact date Australia was written is unknown.  Within the 7 stanzas of Australia, Hope presents a very negative view of the country, Australia, through the exploration of the spiritual poverty that Australia is ostensibly subject to. Hope describes the ‘nation’ as ‘drab and desolate’, indicating that Australia is a monstrous, dreary place. This, on a side note, is very interesting as it was very recently in the 40s, that Australia had just established it’s image and nationality to the world through it’s involvement in World War 1. Thus the poem becomes a juxtaposition of societies’ view of Australia; national and international, versus the patriarchal stance of the writer.

Each stanza consists of a four line-rhyming scheme of ABBA, which enhances the easy reading aspect of the poem. This is very clearly seen through the word –endings of the first stanza, ‘grey-wars-paws-away’. This form of rhyming scheme would have been very important in a poem such as this, to allow for an easier acceptance of a poem that clearly be-little’s Australia.

Hope then couple’s this rhyming scheme with the use of imagery, to further enhance his idea of the bleakness of the nation. Through derogative language including ‘drab green’, and ‘desolate grey’, Hope divulges the insipidness of the landscape. Words such as these present ideas of dull-ness, already in the first lines notioning audiences to view Australia through this new lens. The phrase give a sense of grouping in Australia, generally this grouping could have been taken through a positive association to Australia’s mateship, however, Hope ensures the negative view of this phrase through the deliberate use of ‘monotonous’, hereby presenting the repetitive and tedious aspect of the nation he lives in. Through this mere phrase, Hope hastily destroys any individuality present in Australia, defining it as a place were all tribes, or people, are the same. Presenting an image in his audience’s minds of similarity to the extent that it is almost unbearable and should be frowned upon. This also greatly contradicts the image of multi-culturalism Australia had begun to build. This line likens itself to a proceeding line, ‘field uniform of modern wars’, where everything is in a strict uniform, a uniform of dull coloring; in shades of grey and green. Colors symbolically used by the Australian military to fade into the background. An idea Hope is equating to Australia, by stripping the land of her uniqueness, and individuality.

Hope then examines this imagery further through the further enhancement of this viewpoint. The Alliterated ‘drab green, desolate grey and ‘last of lands’, provide this extra notion, pushing audiences to view the nation through the author’s eyes. This alliteration enhances the hard ‘d’ and ‘g’ sounds that provide the dreary aspect of Australia. Hope goes as far to describe it as ‘the emptiest’. As well as this, the sibilance of ‘savage and scarlet’ reveals the authors despise towards the nations identity, as all words used in description are of a cruel nature. The tone of the poem is mocking and through the use of a metaphor Hope made when implying the abstract ‘human-like’ qualities by referring to Australia as she; he also mocks culture, history, land and the Australian way of life.

Through the use of personification, Hope further accentuates his viewpoint of Australia. He begins by referring Australia to ‘her, in the line ‘they call her a young country’, speaking of the country like one speaks of a woman. However Australia isn’t portrayed angelically or full of life, and ‘Australia’ becomes the criticism of the Australian culture, and land. Hope states, ‘they call her a young country, a women beyond her change in life, a breast still tender but within the womb is dry’. Through this powerful statement Hope declares Australia’s, or this ‘woman’s’ inability to bear and raise children, not questioning the ability of her to raise them healthy, but outright denying her ability to bear the at all. This personification is translated to a country, giving audiences the idea that Hope believes that the land is barren and un-fit to sustain life. This personification further supports Hope’s claim when he states, ‘She is the last of lands, the emptiest; within the womb dry, without songs, architecture and history. Hope portrays Australia, a woman as a series of disappointments; she was supposed to be able to bear children, she failed; she was supposed to be one of culture and amusement, rich in history; again, she failed. This mainly occurs during the first 5 stanzas, as ‘she’ is portrayed as a series of absences. Hope tells audiences that those who come to live in Australia pride themselves not of living, but ‘merely surviveing’. Through likening the country to a woman, Hope portrays her in an excessively negative light, successfully degrading any image and reputation the country had been building.

Hope’s lines carry them selves heavily with negative images. In the first stanza, Hope likens the country to being like a ‘Sphinx’, in the line, ‘those endless outstretched paws of Sphinx demolished or stone lion worn away’. The Sphinx was a predominant figure in Egyptian culture, a figure possessing the body of a lion and the head of a man. Symbolically, the Sphinx is a representation in Egyptian mythology of strength and wisdom. This comparison could be directly related to the author’s vision of Australia. The Sphinx was once new and un-affected by time, seen as a creature of great wisdom. However, through describing the figure as ‘demolished’ and ‘worn away’, Hope presents the idea that Australia’s reach and realm of intelligence, power and greatness has too, ‘worn away’. Hope suggests that Australia used to be better, more new, like the Sphinx, however now the old reputation has gone, and the country is wilting under the effects of time.

Australia to him is devoid of culture. Hope, as previously mentioned, describes her as without songs, architecture and history. Her rivers, are described as of ‘immense stupidity’ in the line rivers of water drown among inland sands, The river of her immense stupidity.’  Though Hope believes that the country has no culture or heritage, he believes it has the capability to do so; except the ideas ‘drown among inland sands’. It is here Hope, not only attacks Australia’s culture, but also degrades the intelligence of it’s inhabitants; describing them as with ‘immense stupidity’. As Australia was originally thought of as the place Britain sent the convicts, the author puts foreword a notion that the people who come here are not happy or happily entering a new country. Instead, that they are, ‘second-hand Europeans’ on ‘alien shores’. Even the word ‘alien’ adds to the negative connotation of the poem. Describing Australia as some out-cast and un-known land. As it is common behavior for people to withdraw from the unknown; Hope utilizes the word alien to create a hesitation towards Australia. The proceeding lines to this indicate Hope’s view that Australia once was great. Hope states ‘drains her, a vast parasite robber state’. Hope sees people as a drain upon the country, and presents the new-comers as parasite- like, taking all good from the country and thus diminishing it to it’s current ‘drab and desolate state’. Furthermore, the phrase ‘second-hand- Europeans’, successfully diminishes Australia’s international image, as the author describes it’s inhabitants as ‘second hand’. The idea of an item being ‘second hand’ carries itself heavily with negative connotation. Symbolically, second hand items are given to those that are poor and needy; an idea, which relates itself to Hope’s idea of a ‘barren’ and ‘monotonous’ land. In Hope’s view, Australia is un-deserving of new items, rather having to settle for those from Europe. Hope insults Australia’s inhabitants through this negative language, in the process also degrading it’s mother country, England, in an attempt to belittle all with even a small relation to Australia.

i haven't done a conclusion yet
but thank you so much in advance :) and i'd really appreciate any thoughts
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Maz

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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #42 on: April 21, 2016, 01:08:23 pm »
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Hey
this is an essay i wrote on A Doll's house
the question was: Discourses evident within a text help to identify the social, historical, and/or cultural conditions in which a literately work is produced. Discuss with reference to A Doll’s House
we were also supposed to refer to feminism and marxism...

A recurring theme amongst Ibsen’s plays includes the social issue discussing the oppression of women by conventions limiting them to a domesticated life. This theme recurs amongst a range of Ibsen’s plays; including A doll’s house. Throughout the drama, Ibsen presents a reflection of the world around him, allowing for a universal approach to the text, while exploring the lives of character’s, whom are trapped by social constraints. Ibsen explores key aspects of society including Feminism and Marxism and the effect the deprivation of these can have upon individuals. A Dolls House represented the contextual issues of Norwegian society in the era of the plays publication; 1880s. Through the characteristics of control and deception and the analysis of discourse, Ibsen in a way scrutinizes the effects of social, and cultural conditions in society, declaring through I famous quote, ‘I am in revolt of against the age- old lie that the majority is always right’


The play débuted at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, Denmark on the 21st of December 1879, two weeks after it’s first publication. At the time of publication the play elicited much debate centered around the abrupt deviation from cultural and social stereotypes of it’s characters; in particular of the play’s protagonist; Nora. This debate was not limited wholly within Norwegian society, but was a universal occurrence. Subsequently, Ibsen was forced to provide an alternate ending by management in Germany, such that even the actor refused to play a woman who would not ‘want to see her children ’ and ‘cant stay here with you (her husband) any longer’. This path of thinking was an abrupt and shocking deviation from societies attitudes and values at the time. Harley Granville-Barker commented upon the play when it finally reached the London stage, stating, ‘the most dramatic even of the decade’. As it seemed, Nora’s abrupt departure from her doll’s house affected the mind of both sexes.  The idea of feminism explores the notion of equality amongst sexes, in all of intellectual, economic and political forms. At the time of publication, it would have been an idea that highlights the degrading view of women, and their portrayal as the ‘other, of less significance’, in real world and literature. Since the 19th century, this focus has been shifted more away from women to a movement towards covering the degradation of both sexes equally. Prior to late 1800s, Norwegian society reflected it’s patriarchal stance through the subjugation of women. These restrictions were reflected alongside the reception of Nora’s actions by Mrs. Linde, ‘a wife can’t borrow money without her husband’s consent’. Alongside laws banning women from taking loans, women were also unable to file for divorce or vote. Exceptions to these laws were only permissible if the woman was acting under her male caretaker’s permission. Women were considered careless and incapable and thus dissolved of any power. Due to this, they were expected to stay home, urged by the stigmatization often subjected upon those who chose to deviate from society’s imposed restrictions. Ibsen further explores this aspect through Nora’s dialogue ‘I passed out of Daddy’s hands into yours (her husbands)’, illuminating the extent of the extreme patriarchy amongst society at the time. Ibsen powerfully highlight’s this idea, through Helmer’s declaration that women, in that society, were given one role, to be, ‘first and foremost, you are a wife and a mother’. It was not until 1888 that a law was passed, ending the authority of the husband over the wife. Ibsen’s intent upon the portrayal of women through ‘A Doll’s house’ was clear through some notes he had made, where he clearly highlighted the anomalous position of women in the prevailing patriarchal society, ‘A women (he wrote) cannot be herself in contemporary society; it is an exclusively male society with laws drafted by men, and with counsel judges who judge feminine conduct from the male point of view’*. In closing the door on her husband and children, Nora paved the way for the women’s movement, through her opposition of the expected norms in society.
 

Marxism is a method of socioeconomic analysis, an idea that ‘actions and human institutions are economically determined, that the class struggle is the basic agency of historical change’*2 The play opens on a scene where Nora enters with a bare Christmas tree, carrying a number of parcels and the proceeding discourse becomes evidence of Nora’s submission to commercialism, ‘Hide the Christmas tree away carefully, Helene. The children mustn’t see it till this evening when it is decorated’. Although a minor action, through a Marxist lens the need to dress the tree can be associated symbolically with commercialism, presenting Nora as one who is being forced to submit to socioeconomic standards. This Nora further exemplifies through her quote, ‘There’s a crown. Keep the change’. Though it is openly discussed between Nora and her husband that ‘this is the first Christmas they haven’t had to go carefully’ and implied that the family has had money issues in the past, Nora gives the money to the Porter and doesn’t ask for change. This is perhaps the first hint in the play societal thinking, during that era. Through this quote, Nora’s deludes the Porter of the low financial position of her family and gives the illusion that they are in a better condition than they actually are. This ornamentation of one’s socioeconomic status and an exemplification of the importance of it, is an everlasting theme amongst literature and subsequently, a reflection of society.  According to this notion of Marxism, Nora has become overwhelmed by her surroundings to the extent that she feels no option but to submit to the patriarchal society.


Through-out the majority of the play Nora is portrayed as the subservient wife, ready to propitiate her husband, believing him the ‘head of the household’ and her caretaker. Ibsen portrays this social norm through her dialogue, ‘I would never dream of doing anything you didn’t want me to’. Though through the surrounding conversation by Helmer, ‘All right then! It’s really just my little joke’, and ‘I know that’, it can be deduced that she is saying this out of love, this phrase is a striking representation of society at the time. Ibsen creates a presentation of women as being unable to dream, let alone act upon thoughts that would potentially be against the wishes of their male counterparts; highlighting upon the extent of subjugation evident amongst society towards women, such that even ‘her’ dreams are being controlled and fine-lined to fit inside the boundaries of a patriarchal society. However it is not only Nora’s dialogue that becomes a reminder of a woman’s ‘place’, but also the dialogue of her husband, Helmer. Helmer has opted to utilize morality and honesty in order to achieve his success, both of which have been to some extent fruitful to him and thus, he is portrayed as the ‘pillar of society’. However, included in this pillar is the acceptance of Helmer’s superiority over Nora, an idea Helmer exercises through the way in which he addresses his wife.  In the very first page of the play, he addresses Nora, ‘my little sky-lark chirping’ and in the proceeding pages, ‘my little squirrel frisking’ and ‘my pretty little pet’. Upon analysis of these nicknames it is evident of their substandard connotation. In all, he refers to her as an animal, substantiating society’s view of women as the ‘lesser’. Ibsen artfully couples each animal name with a verb to allow Helmer to accentuate his superiority over Nora. The extent of this superiority is realized to audiences later when Nora herself begins calling herself ‘it’; ‘we call it a spendthrift’. This discourse perhaps takes another level of subjugation, through likening Nora, a woman, with an inanimate object that has no feelings or personal thoughts. Through the symbolism of referring Nora to an object, Ibsen’s society is articulately reflected, through the positioning of women to be ‘conscious-less’. More astounding than this is the ease at which Nora refers to herself as an ‘it’, highlighting that this discourse would have been a common occurrence.  Thus, through this, Helmer surreptitiously reminds Nora of her place as the ‘working wife’ and the ‘sacrificer’, so that when the time comes Helmer is in the domineering position to give his wife everything, except that which society at the time restricted him from giving;                              ‘Helmer:  I would gladly work night and day for you. Nora- bear sorrow and want for your sake. But no …………man would sacrifice his honor for the.one he loves.
Nora: It is a thing hundreds of thousands of women have done.”

Ibsen enhances the lack of feminism through careful use of discourse to portray certain character traits amongst his characters that, at the era of production would have been viewed as flaws and a retardation from societal norms. To cope with the behavioral boundaries imposed from society, certain character’s placed strategies in which to cope, one of these strategies being ‘control’. Examples of character’s attempting to control their environment are a frequent occurrence throughout the play, catalyzed primarily by their subjugation and victimization. Though Nora openly stated, ‘I would never dream of doing anything you didn’t want me to’, as the play progresses she disregards Helmer’s wishes on spending less money, eating sweets and paying for her husband’s treatment. Perhaps the primary example of Nora’s need to control her environment is the reason she takes her husband on holiday. Nora believed that Helmer was in dire need of a vacation, despite Helmer making it clear that he didn’t want to go, ‘(when Nora presented the idea), ‘being frivolous, that it was his duty as a husband not to give in to all the whims and fancies of mine’. Despite this reluctance on Helmer’s part, decides to hide the true extent of her husband’s illness from him and insists on taking him, ‘It was necessary he should have no idea what a dangerous condition he was in. It was to me that the doctors came and said that his life was in danger, and that the only thing to save him was to live in the south. Do you suppose I didn't try, first of all, to get what I wanted as if it were for myself?’ This excerpt portrays Nora’s nature, and the resultant effect of her suppression. Nora, in taking a loan out, was ready to ‘take the law into her own hands’ and becoming a ‘hypocrite, a liar, and worse than that, a criminal! Mr’s Linde is also shocked when she hears of Nora’s actions;               
 ‘Mrs Linde: Listen, Nora, are you sure you haven’t done something rash?
Nora: Is it rash to save your husband’s life?
Mrs Linde: I think it’s rash if you do it without his knowledge’      
It is evident through discourse, that Nora is still oblivious to the illegality of her actions and has little comprehension of the magnitude of misfortune she may be in. Conversely, the exchange becomes an illumination of Nora’s frame of thinking; for her, any method she may take to reach a particular end point is justified if the desired end point ensues.  Her approach to this dilemma is to control the situation, through bypassing any consultation that may result in an idea contradictory to her’s. Her statement, ‘‘I would never dream of doing anything you didn’t want me to’ become seemingly more and more implausible as the play progresses.                      Despite Nora’s autarchic actions, she remains un-punished. This however, changes following Nora’s fraudulent actions and her subsequent treatment of Krogstad, which prompts him to write a letter to Helmer with the intention of disclosing his wife’s actions.  It is at this stage another one of Nora’s controlled situation’s emerges and Nora, out of desperation searches for ways to prevent Hemler from opening the letterbox and learning of her secret. Ibsen portrays the ghastly effects of the subjugation upon women, through an exploration of the side-effect of deception. Nora, when practicing her dance turns the situation to her advantage, by deterring her husband from checking the letter-box were Krogstad had placed the letter;            
 ‘Nora: What are you going to do there?
Helmer: Only see if any letters have come.
Nora: No, no! Don’t do that, Torvald!
Helmer: Why not?
Nora: Torvald, please don't. There aren’t any.
Helmer: Just let me see’
Subsequently, Nora successfully gains her husband’s attention and she begins to dance so wildly that he has to tell her, ‘Not so Fast! Not so Fast!’ and ‘Not so wild, Nora!’ Perhaps the most important discourse Ibsen utilises to present the desperation of Nora and her subsequent need to control, is portrayed through, ‘Nora you are dancing as if your life depended on it’, to which she replies, ‘it does’.  This discourse accurately portrays the position of women amongst society at the time, and more importantly, the position of the wife. The negative consequences of the patriarchal society become evident as Nora finds that her ‘life depended’ upon keeping her actions a secret and ensuring her husband never discovers her mistake, and thus devises a stratagem to cover-up the action, reflecting the austere expectations for women to fit the role of the innocent and be the perfect wife, to the extent that Nora described it as a matter of life. Subjecting woman to these extreme conditions for large interludes can be described as the cause of Nora’s controlling tendencies. From a post-feministic view-point is can be concluded that Ibsen, through the use of discourse presented his society with a reflection of itself, with the intention of illustrating the resultant effects of this severe subjugation, and thus, in doing so, Ibsen not only provides a description of society at the time, but also explores the resultant future effects of the hierarchal society; in which women were enforced to conceive severe processes to cope.

Deception is a peculiarity often associated profoundly to control, and thus becomes another subterfuge through which Ibsen echoes societal values. Ibsen articulately incorporates deception within A Doll’s house, to create a replication of the deleterious features of society and the coping mechanism’s women in the 19th century adopted as a means of survival. This innate characteristic of deception is evident within the opening of the play and becomes the first test of Nora’s honesty; a test that she fails. Helmer repeatedly makes it clear that he doesn’t approve of Nora ‘popping into the confectioner’s’. Upon Nora’s return Helmer immediately questions her as to if she ‘forgot herself in town?’ and ‘Hasn’t miss sweet-tooth been breaking rules in town today?’ Nora immediately denies this, ‘no I assure you Trovold’ despite audiences later observing that she ‘takes the bag out of her hand’, and offers them to Dr. Rank, stating, ‘what about a little macaroon?’ To this, even the doctor questions her, ‘I thought they (referring to the mararoons) were forbidden here’. Through this discourse, Ibsen divulges that after eight years of marriage in a patriarchal society, Nora has developed strategies in which to be able to follow her likes and dislikes, while concurrently keeping her husband happy. This was a direct portrayal of 19th century Norwegian society, where women were expected to give up many of their personal preferences in order to please their husbands.       Though it may be possible to overlook the ‘little white lies’, some of Nora’s deception, however, has larger consequences. Another example of Nora’s deception appears again in an interaction between Helmer;
‘Helmer; Do you remember last Christmas? Three whole weeks beforehand you shut yourself up every evening till after midnight making flowers for the Christmas tree and all the other splendid things you wanted to surprise us with. Ugh, I never felt so bored in all my life.
Nora: I wasn’t the least bit bored.
Helmer (smiling). But it turned a bit of an anticlimax, Nora.’
The audience then learns the truth about what Nora was actually doing when she ‘shut yourself up every evening’ a few passages later through her conversation with her friend Mrs. Linde, ‘Last winter I was lucky enough to get a lot of copying to do; so I locked myself up and sat writing every evening until quite late at night’ . Despite Nora’s justification for these lies to be of a good nature, her deceptive nature is still evident. One deceptive act translates into another, and Nora’s nature changes completely as she attempts to cope with the cultural and social values of society. The danger of Nora’s deception, however, is not fully recognized until another conversation with Mr’s. Linde when she asks, ‘Won’t you ever tell him?’, to which Nora replies, ‘perhaps one day’ and ‘Then it might be a good idea to have something up my sleeve’. It is evident through this dialogue that Nora feels no guilt or humiliation in the lengths she goes to, to achieve her way. Thus, through discourse, Ibsen once again proves Nora’s adaptability to her environment; she has learned to survive and control a situation, from the position of the beleaguered and subservient wife.                              
   Throughout the progression of the play, Nora’s little lies continue and audiences are given the impression that she may be habitual liar, a trait even Helmer discovers;    
Helmer: Has anyone been here?
Nora: Here? No.
Helmer: That’s funny. I saw Krogstad leaving the house.
Nora: Really? Yes, that’s right, Krogstad was here for a minute.
 It becomes evident through this discourse, that Nora has made a routine of lying, to a magnitude that she doesn’t need to think twice on lying to serve her own purpose, even to those closest to her. This demeanor endures throughout the play, climaxing in Act 3, at what time Nora makes the final assertion of her departure. Though this scene brought on enthusiastic welcome from many feminists throughout time, a deeper look, indicates the real dark reason of the ‘doll’s’ abrupt departure from her house. The survival strategies Nora originally employed have evidently failed her, however, instead of changing her ways, Nora adapts to her new situation through careful modification of her strategies. She does this through the monopolisation of discourse and an obstinate repudiation to discuss the reasons for her departure. Nora then departs from her untenable situation, declaring; ‘I must stand on my own two feet if I'm to get to know myself and the world outside. That's why I can't stay here with you any longer.’ Thus, through an articulate utilization of discourse, Ibsen presents the 19th century woman as immature and deceitful, however also displays that as time passes she becomes more able to decide what it best for her. Ibsen reveals and discusses the social and cultural position of women in his context and the innate resultant instinct of survival some developed in order to achieve some happiness in the strictly patriarchal society. This progression of Nora, developing from the submissive wife who, on the surface, obeyed her husbands ‘commands’, to the emergence on a ‘new Nora’; a women who decided to place herself first, is a direct symbolism of Ibsen’s society through the exploration of the concept of feminism and it’s growth some decades proceeding A Doll’s House.


Ibsen corroborates, through the accentuation of discourse, that Norwegian society during the 19th century was manifested by a severe patriarchal stance. Ibsen highlight’s the effects of this frame of thinking through the deviation of ‘stereotypical’ behaviors in relation to gender, namely, Nora’s infatuation with control and deceit to escape the entrapment and subjugation placed heavily upon females. A Dolls House is a reflection of the social and cultural norms as it deals with prominent issues that occurred during 19th century; discussing not only society’s conditions but also the resultant effects upon the subjugated.
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HopefulLawStudent

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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #43 on: April 21, 2016, 04:10:42 pm »
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Hey
this is an essay i wrote on A Doll's house
the question was: Discourses evident within a text help to identify the social, historical, and/or cultural conditions in which a literately work is produced. Discuss with reference to A Doll’s House
we were also supposed to refer to feminism and marxism...

A recurring theme amongst Ibsen’s plays includes the social issue discussing the oppression of women by conventions limiting them to a domesticated life. This theme recurs amongst a range of Ibsen’s plays; including A doll’s house. Throughout the drama, Ibsen presents a reflection of the world around him, allowing for a universal approach to the text, while exploring the lives of character’s, whom are trapped by social constraints. Ibsen explores key aspects of society including Feminism and Marxism and the effect the deprivation of these can have upon individuals. A Dolls House represented the contextual issues of Norwegian society in the era of the plays publication; 1880s. Through the characteristics of control and deception and the analysis of discourse, Ibsen in a way scrutinizes the effects of social, and cultural conditions in society, declaring through I famous quote, ‘I am in revolt of against the age- old lie that the majority is always right’


The play débuted at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, Denmark on the 21st of December 1879, two weeks after it’s first publication. At the time of publication the play elicited much debate centered around the abrupt deviation from cultural and social stereotypes of it’s characters; in particular of the play’s protagonist; Nora. This debate was not limited wholly within Norwegian society, but was a universal occurrence. Subsequently, Ibsen was forced to provide an alternate ending by management in Germany, such that even the actor refused to play a woman who would not ‘want to see her children ’ and ‘cant stay here with you (her husband) any longer’. This path of thinking was an abrupt and shocking deviation from societies attitudes and values at the time. Harley Granville-Barker commented upon the play when it finally reached the London stage, stating, ‘the most dramatic even of the decade’. As it seemed, Nora’s abrupt departure from her doll’s house affected the mind of both sexes.  The idea of feminism explores the notion of equality amongst sexes, in all of intellectual, economic and political forms. At the time of publication, it would have been an idea that highlights the degrading view of women, and their portrayal as the ‘other, of less significance’, in real world and literature. Since the 19th century, this focus has been shifted more away from women to a movement towards covering the degradation of both sexes equally. Prior to late 1800s, Norwegian society reflected it’s patriarchal stance through the subjugation of women. These restrictions were reflected alongside the reception of Nora’s actions by Mrs. Linde, ‘a wife can’t borrow money without her husband’s consent’. Alongside laws banning women from taking loans, women were also unable to file for divorce or vote. Exceptions to these laws were only permissible if the woman was acting under her male caretaker’s permission. Women were considered careless and incapable and thus dissolved of any power. Due to this, they were expected to stay home, urged by the stigmatization often subjected upon those who chose to deviate from society’s imposed restrictions. Ibsen further explores this aspect through Nora’s dialogue ‘I passed out of Daddy’s hands into yours (her husbands)’, illuminating the extent of the extreme patriarchy amongst society at the time. Ibsen powerfully highlight’s this idea, through Helmer’s declaration that women, in that society, were given one role, to be, ‘first and foremost, you are a wife and a mother’. It was not until 1888 that a law was passed, ending the authority of the husband over the wife. Ibsen’s intent upon the portrayal of women through ‘A Doll’s house’ was clear through some notes he had made, where he clearly highlighted the anomalous position of women in the prevailing patriarchal society, ‘A women (he wrote) cannot be herself in contemporary society; it is an exclusively male society with laws drafted by men, and with counsel judges who judge feminine conduct from the male point of view’*. In closing the door on her husband and children, Nora paved the way for the women’s movement, through her opposition of the expected norms in society.
 

Marxism is a method of socioeconomic analysis, an idea that ‘actions and human institutions are economically determined, that the class struggle is the basic agency of historical change’*2 The play opens on a scene where Nora enters with a bare Christmas tree, carrying a number of parcels and the proceeding discourse becomes evidence of Nora’s submission to commercialism, ‘Hide the Christmas tree away carefully, Helene. The children mustn’t see it till this evening when it is decorated’. Although a minor action, through a Marxist lens the need to dress the tree can be associated symbolically with commercialism, presenting Nora as one who is being forced to submit to socioeconomic standards. This Nora further exemplifies through her quote, ‘There’s a crown. Keep the change’. Though it is openly discussed between Nora and her husband that ‘this is the first Christmas they haven’t had to go carefully’ and implied that the family has had money issues in the past, Nora gives the money to the Porter and doesn’t ask for change. This is perhaps the first hint in the play societal thinking, during that era. Through this quote, Nora’s deludes the Porter of the low financial position of her family and gives the illusion that they are in a better condition than they actually are. This ornamentation of one’s socioeconomic status and an exemplification of the importance of it, is an everlasting theme amongst literature and subsequently, a reflection of society.  According to this notion of Marxism, Nora has become overwhelmed by her surroundings to the extent that she feels no option but to submit to the patriarchal society.


Through-out the majority of the play Nora is portrayed as the subservient wife, ready to propitiate her husband, believing him the ‘head of the household’ and her caretaker. Ibsen portrays this social norm through her dialogue, ‘I would never dream of doing anything you didn’t want me to’. Though through the surrounding conversation by Helmer, ‘All right then! It’s really just my little joke’, and ‘I know that’, it can be deduced that she is saying this out of love, this phrase is a striking representation of society at the time. Ibsen creates a presentation of women as being unable to dream, let alone act upon thoughts that would potentially be against the wishes of their male counterparts; highlighting upon the extent of subjugation evident amongst society towards women, such that even ‘her’ dreams are being controlled and fine-lined to fit inside the boundaries of a patriarchal society. However it is not only Nora’s dialogue that becomes a reminder of a woman’s ‘place’, but also the dialogue of her husband, Helmer. Helmer has opted to utilize morality and honesty in order to achieve his success, both of which have been to some extent fruitful to him and thus, he is portrayed as the ‘pillar of society’. However, included in this pillar is the acceptance of Helmer’s superiority over Nora, an idea Helmer exercises through the way in which he addresses his wife.  In the very first page of the play, he addresses Nora, ‘my little sky-lark chirping’ and in the proceeding pages, ‘my little squirrel frisking’ and ‘my pretty little pet’. Upon analysis of these nicknames it is evident of their substandard connotation. In all, he refers to her as an animal, substantiating society’s view of women as the ‘lesser’. Ibsen artfully couples each animal name with a verb to allow Helmer to accentuate his superiority over Nora. The extent of this superiority is realized to audiences later when Nora herself begins calling herself ‘it’; ‘we call it a spendthrift’. This discourse perhaps takes another level of subjugation, through likening Nora, a woman, with an inanimate object that has no feelings or personal thoughts. Through the symbolism of referring Nora to an object, Ibsen’s society is articulately reflected, through the positioning of women to be ‘conscious-less’. More astounding than this is the ease at which Nora refers to herself as an ‘it’, highlighting that this discourse would have been a common occurrence.  Thus, through this, Helmer surreptitiously reminds Nora of her place as the ‘working wife’ and the ‘sacrificer’, so that when the time comes Helmer is in the domineering position to give his wife everything, except that which society at the time restricted him from giving;                              ‘Helmer:  I would gladly work night and day for you. Nora- bear sorrow and want for your sake. But no …………man would sacrifice his honor for the.one he loves.
Nora: It is a thing hundreds of thousands of women have done.”

Ibsen enhances the lack of feminism through careful use of discourse to portray certain character traits amongst his characters that, at the era of production would have been viewed as flaws and a retardation from societal norms. To cope with the behavioral boundaries imposed from society, certain character’s placed strategies in which to cope, one of these strategies being ‘control’. Examples of character’s attempting to control their environment are a frequent occurrence throughout the play, catalyzed primarily by their subjugation and victimization. Though Nora openly stated, ‘I would never dream of doing anything you didn’t want me to’, as the play progresses she disregards Helmer’s wishes on spending less money, eating sweets and paying for her husband’s treatment. Perhaps the primary example of Nora’s need to control her environment is the reason she takes her husband on holiday. Nora believed that Helmer was in dire need of a vacation, despite Helmer making it clear that he didn’t want to go, ‘(when Nora presented the idea), ‘being frivolous, that it was his duty as a husband not to give in to all the whims and fancies of mine’. Despite this reluctance on Helmer’s part, decides to hide the true extent of her husband’s illness from him and insists on taking him, ‘It was necessary he should have no idea what a dangerous condition he was in. It was to me that the doctors came and said that his life was in danger, and that the only thing to save him was to live in the south. Do you suppose I didn't try, first of all, to get what I wanted as if it were for myself?’ This excerpt portrays Nora’s nature, and the resultant effect of her suppression. Nora, in taking a loan out, was ready to ‘take the law into her own hands’ and becoming a ‘hypocrite, a liar, and worse than that, a criminal! Mr’s Linde is also shocked when she hears of Nora’s actions;               
 ‘Mrs Linde: Listen, Nora, are you sure you haven’t done something rash?
Nora: Is it rash to save your husband’s life?
Mrs Linde: I think it’s rash if you do it without his knowledge’      
It is evident through discourse, that Nora is still oblivious to the illegality of her actions and has little comprehension of the magnitude of misfortune she may be in. Conversely, the exchange becomes an illumination of Nora’s frame of thinking; for her, any method she may take to reach a particular end point is justified if the desired end point ensues.  Her approach to this dilemma is to control the situation, through bypassing any consultation that may result in an idea contradictory to her’s. Her statement, ‘‘I would never dream of doing anything you didn’t want me to’ become seemingly more and more implausible as the play progresses.                      Despite Nora’s autarchic actions, she remains un-punished. This however, changes following Nora’s fraudulent actions and her subsequent treatment of Krogstad, which prompts him to write a letter to Helmer with the intention of disclosing his wife’s actions.  It is at this stage another one of Nora’s controlled situation’s emerges and Nora, out of desperation searches for ways to prevent Hemler from opening the letterbox and learning of her secret. Ibsen portrays the ghastly effects of the subjugation upon women, through an exploration of the side-effect of deception. Nora, when practicing her dance turns the situation to her advantage, by deterring her husband from checking the letter-box were Krogstad had placed the letter;            
 ‘Nora: What are you going to do there?
Helmer: Only see if any letters have come.
Nora: No, no! Don’t do that, Torvald!
Helmer: Why not?
Nora: Torvald, please don't. There aren’t any.
Helmer: Just let me see’
Subsequently, Nora successfully gains her husband’s attention and she begins to dance so wildly that he has to tell her, ‘Not so Fast! Not so Fast!’ and ‘Not so wild, Nora!’ Perhaps the most important discourse Ibsen utilises to present the desperation of Nora and her subsequent need to control, is portrayed through, ‘Nora you are dancing as if your life depended on it’, to which she replies, ‘it does’.  This discourse accurately portrays the position of women amongst society at the time, and more importantly, the position of the wife. The negative consequences of the patriarchal society become evident as Nora finds that her ‘life depended’ upon keeping her actions a secret and ensuring her husband never discovers her mistake, and thus devises a stratagem to cover-up the action, reflecting the austere expectations for women to fit the role of the innocent and be the perfect wife, to the extent that Nora described it as a matter of life. Subjecting woman to these extreme conditions for large interludes can be described as the cause of Nora’s controlling tendencies. From a post-feministic view-point is can be concluded that Ibsen, through the use of discourse presented his society with a reflection of itself, with the intention of illustrating the resultant effects of this severe subjugation, and thus, in doing so, Ibsen not only provides a description of society at the time, but also explores the resultant future effects of the hierarchal society; in which women were enforced to conceive severe processes to cope.

Deception is a peculiarity often associated profoundly to control, and thus becomes another subterfuge through which Ibsen echoes societal values. Ibsen articulately incorporates deception within A Doll’s house, to create a replication of the deleterious features of society and the coping mechanism’s women in the 19th century adopted as a means of survival. This innate characteristic of deception is evident within the opening of the play and becomes the first test of Nora’s honesty; a test that she fails. Helmer repeatedly makes it clear that he doesn’t approve of Nora ‘popping into the confectioner’s’. Upon Nora’s return Helmer immediately questions her as to if she ‘forgot herself in town?’ and ‘Hasn’t miss sweet-tooth been breaking rules in town today?’ Nora immediately denies this, ‘no I assure you Trovold’ despite audiences later observing that she ‘takes the bag out of her hand’, and offers them to Dr. Rank, stating, ‘what about a little macaroon?’ To this, even the doctor questions her, ‘I thought they (referring to the mararoons) were forbidden here’. Through this discourse, Ibsen divulges that after eight years of marriage in a patriarchal society, Nora has developed strategies in which to be able to follow her likes and dislikes, while concurrently keeping her husband happy. This was a direct portrayal of 19th century Norwegian society, where women were expected to give up many of their personal preferences in order to please their husbands.       Though it may be possible to overlook the ‘little white lies’, some of Nora’s deception, however, has larger consequences. Another example of Nora’s deception appears again in an interaction between Helmer;
‘Helmer; Do you remember last Christmas? Three whole weeks beforehand you shut yourself up every evening till after midnight making flowers for the Christmas tree and all the other splendid things you wanted to surprise us with. Ugh, I never felt so bored in all my life.
Nora: I wasn’t the least bit bored.
Helmer (smiling). But it turned a bit of an anticlimax, Nora.’
The audience then learns the truth about what Nora was actually doing when she ‘shut yourself up every evening’ a few passages later through her conversation with her friend Mrs. Linde, ‘Last winter I was lucky enough to get a lot of copying to do; so I locked myself up and sat writing every evening until quite late at night’ . Despite Nora’s justification for these lies to be of a good nature, her deceptive nature is still evident. One deceptive act translates into another, and Nora’s nature changes completely as she attempts to cope with the cultural and social values of society. The danger of Nora’s deception, however, is not fully recognized until another conversation with Mr’s. Linde when she asks, ‘Won’t you ever tell him?’, to which Nora replies, ‘perhaps one day’ and ‘Then it might be a good idea to have something up my sleeve’. It is evident through this dialogue that Nora feels no guilt or humiliation in the lengths she goes to, to achieve her way. Thus, through discourse, Ibsen once again proves Nora’s adaptability to her environment; she has learned to survive and control a situation, from the position of the beleaguered and subservient wife.                              
   Throughout the progression of the play, Nora’s little lies continue and audiences are given the impression that she may be habitual liar, a trait even Helmer discovers;    
Helmer: Has anyone been here?
Nora: Here? No.
Helmer: That’s funny. I saw Krogstad leaving the house.
Nora: Really? Yes, that’s right, Krogstad was here for a minute.
 It becomes evident through this discourse, that Nora has made a routine of lying, to a magnitude that she doesn’t need to think twice on lying to serve her own purpose, even to those closest to her. This demeanor endures throughout the play, climaxing in Act 3, at what time Nora makes the final assertion of her departure. Though this scene brought on enthusiastic welcome from many feminists throughout time, a deeper look, indicates the real dark reason of the ‘doll’s’ abrupt departure from her house. The survival strategies Nora originally employed have evidently failed her, however, instead of changing her ways, Nora adapts to her new situation through careful modification of her strategies. She does this through the monopolisation of discourse and an obstinate repudiation to discuss the reasons for her departure. Nora then departs from her untenable situation, declaring; ‘I must stand on my own two feet if I'm to get to know myself and the world outside. That's why I can't stay here with you any longer.’ Thus, through an articulate utilization of discourse, Ibsen presents the 19th century woman as immature and deceitful, however also displays that as time passes she becomes more able to decide what it best for her. Ibsen reveals and discusses the social and cultural position of women in his context and the innate resultant instinct of survival some developed in order to achieve some happiness in the strictly patriarchal society. This progression of Nora, developing from the submissive wife who, on the surface, obeyed her husbands ‘commands’, to the emergence on a ‘new Nora’; a women who decided to place herself first, is a direct symbolism of Ibsen’s society through the exploration of the concept of feminism and it’s growth some decades proceeding A Doll’s House.


Ibsen corroborates, through the accentuation of discourse, that Norwegian society during the 19th century was manifested by a severe patriarchal stance. Ibsen highlight’s the effects of this frame of thinking through the deviation of ‘stereotypical’ behaviors in relation to gender, namely, Nora’s infatuation with control and deceit to escape the entrapment and subjugation placed heavily upon females. A Dolls House is a reflection of the social and cultural norms as it deals with prominent issues that occurred during 19th century; discussing not only society’s conditions but also the resultant effects upon the subjugated.


I don't mean to be rude, but this isn't a close analysis essay. The people over here on the VCE Lit board won't be able to give you the help you need because we won't be 100% familiar with the criteria on which you'll be marked. Perhaps consider visiting the WA board? They'll be able to give you more accurate and relevant feedback imo.

literally lauren

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Re: Literature Close Analysis Essay Submission Feedback Thread.
« Reply #44 on: April 22, 2016, 12:56:58 pm »
+2
I don't mean to be rude, but this isn't a close analysis essay. The people over here on the VCE Lit board won't be able to give you the help you need because we won't be 100% familiar with the criteria on which you'll be marked. Perhaps consider visiting the WA board? They'll be able to give you more accurate and relevant feedback imo.
All good - I told mq to post it here as opposed to PMing me for feedback. And yeah, this is way more extensive than what VCE Lit. kids will have to do, so though it's kind of similar to the Alternate Views SAC, this isn't wholly relevant to anyone studying A Doll's House in VCE. But the WA boards can be hard to find and are basically dead (for now.) One day ATAR Notes will conquer all of the states and we'll have resources that span this whole continent. Except Queensland. They know what they did -.-

@mq: I'm only going to mark this for clarity and structure since I took a look at the WA course outline and jfc it's kind of a mess, so I don't really trust myself to critique relevance or how effectively you've addressed the question. Also, trust your teacher's advice over mine for obvious reasons.
Discourses evident within a text help to identify the social, historical, and/or cultural conditions in which a literary work is produced. Discuss with reference to A Doll’s House.

A recurring theme don't use the word theme - it sounds clunky. Refer to the 'concerns' of a text if you have to, or just start talking about that idea - there's no need to flag something as 'one of the themes in the book.' amongst Ibsen’s plays includes careful with plurality - 'A theme includes the issue of...' - probably best to rewrite this intro sentence so it's a bit clearer i.e. 'Throughout ADH, Ibsen highlights the oppression of women by...' the social issue discussing the oppression of women by conventions limiting them to a domesticated life. This theme recurs amongst a range of Ibsen’s plays; including A doll’s house. This is just repeating what you've already said. Throughout the drama 'play' or 'text' would be more conventional, Ibsen presents a reflection of the world around him, allowing for a universal approach to the text, while exploring the lives of character’s no apostrophe needed here, whom are trapped by social constraints. linking word? Ibsen explores key aspects of society including Feminism and Marxism and the effect the deprivation of these can have upon individuals. A Dolls House represented the contextual issues of Norwegian society in the era of the plays publication; 1880s. Through the characteristics I'm not sure 'control' and 'analysis of discourse' are both 'characteristics' in the same sense - what are you trying to say here? of control and deception and the analysis of discourse, Ibsen in a way scrutinizes the effects of social, and cultural conditions in society, declaring through I famous quote himself to be "in revolt against the age-old lie...", ‘I am in revolt of against the age- old lie that the majority is always right’ Nice concluding line, but most of these sentences don't really flow into one another. Consider using some 'Furthermore...'s and 'The text also showcases...'s to smooth things along.


The play débuted at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, Denmark on the 21st of December 1879, two weeks after it’s first publication. At the time of publication the play elicited much debate centered around the abrupt deviation from cultural and social stereotypes of it’s characters; in particular of the play’s protagonist; Nora. Okay, based on my understanding this would be a bit too zoomed out from the text and could easily be condensed to a sentence or less, but if you're teacher's fine with this then don't worry. I tend to advocate for T.S.s that start from the text and then build out in Lit. but that's my bias. This debate was not limited wholly within Norwegian society, but was a universal occurrence. 'Universal' might be a bit of a stretch :P Subsequently, Ibsen was forced to provide an alternate ending by management word check - he didn't really have a 'manager' in Germany, such that even the actor refused to play a woman who would not ‘want to see her children ’ and ‘cant stay here with you (her husband) any longer’. When modifying quotes, you should use [square brackets] and just replace information that you don't need, so this should be: "can't say here with [her husband] any longer." This path of thinking which path? You ended the previous sentence talking about the attitude of actresses, but aren't you talking about Ibsen's Nora's attitudes now? Make your focus clear! was an abrupt and shocking deviation from societies' apostrophe needed here since it's possessive attitudes and values at the time. Harley Granville-Barker commented upon the play when it finally reached the London stage, stating, calling it ‘the most dramatic event of the decade’. As it seemed, Nora’s abrupt departure from her doll’s house explain this - what is her 'doll's house' in the play? affected the mind of both sexes.  The idea of feminism explores the notion of equality amongst sexes, in all of intellectual, economic and political forms. At the time of publication, it would have been an idea that highlights the degrading view of women, and their portrayal as the ‘other, of less significance’, in real world and literature. Since the 19th century, this focus has been shifted more away from women to a movement towards covering the degradation of both sexes equally. Prior to late 1800s, Norwegian society reflected it’s patriarchal stance through the subjugation of women. You need to be a lot more concise and orderly when trying to convey these ideas. First, think about the basic point you're trying to get across since there seems to be a bit of irrelevant information here (i.e. modern feminism concerning itself with both genders - true, but not wholly helpful for this essay). Next, express this in the simplest way possible, preferably in a sentence or less, linking it to the text. You shouldn't need a whole section of your paragraph dedicated to explaining what feminist values are. These restrictions were reflected alongside the reception of Nora’s actions by Mrs. Linde, ‘a wife can’t borrow money without her husband’s consent’. try to integrate this quote within your sentence. Alongside laws banning women from taking loans, women were also unable to file for divorce or vote. Exceptions to these laws were only permissible if the woman was acting under her male caretaker’s permission. Women were considered careless and incapable and thus dissolved of any power. Due to this, they were expected to stay home, urged by the stigmatization often subjected upon those who chose to deviate from society’s imposed restrictions. This is a little better, but the sentences still aren't really flowing together. Plus, the fact that many are around the same length can make your writing seem a bit laboured (see: this) Ibsen further explores this aspect through Nora’s dialogue ‘I passed out of Daddy’s hands into yours (her husbands)’, integrate this quote so it fits your sentence illuminating the extent of the extreme patriarchy amongst society at the time. How does this evidence demonstrate this idea? Ibsen powerfully highlight’s no apostrophe this idea, through Helmer’s declaration that women, in that society, were given one role, to be, ‘first and foremost, you are a wife and a mother’. Slight overuse of commas in that last sentence, but quote integration is better. It was not until 1888 that a law was passed, ending the authority of the husband over the wife. Is this really useful to your discussion? If so, explain how it is useful. Right now, it kind of sticks out a bit as being irrelevant to the sentences on either side of it. Ibsen’s intent upon the portrayal expression is a little clunky of women through ‘A Doll’s house’ was clear through some notes he had made, where he clearly highlighted the anomalous position of women in the prevailing patriarchal society, ‘A women (he wrote) cannot be herself in contemporary society; it is an exclusively male society with laws drafted by men, and with counsel judges who judge feminine conduct from the male point of view’* I'm assuming the asterisk is for a citation? Regardless, this quote needs to be integrated or possibly paraphrased a bit to give you a chance to expand on this idea. Don't let Ibsen do the talking for you! In closing the door on her husband and children, Nora paved the way for the women’s movement, through her opposition of the expected norms in society. Good point, but don't end your paragraph with close textual analysis - this is where you're meant to zoom out and consider overall ideas/interpretations.
 

^Link?-->Marxism is a method of socioeconomic analysis, and an idea that ‘actions and human institutions are economically determined, that the class struggle is the basic agency of historical change’*2 <--Link?--> The play opens on a scene where Nora enters with a bare Christmas tree, carrying a number of parcels and the proceeding discourse becomes evidence of Nora’s submission to commercialism, ‘Hide the Christmas tree away carefully, Helene. The children mustn’t see it till this evening when it is decorated’. integrate Although a minor action, through a Marxist lens the need to dress the tree can be associated symbolically with commercialism, How so? You can't just say X is a symbolic representation of Y without backing up your assertion presenting Nora as one who is being forced to submit to socioeconomic standards. This Nora further exemplifies through her quote, ‘There’s a crown. Keep the change’. What does this mean? How is this quote supporting your interpretation? Though it is openly discussed between Nora and her husband that ‘this is the first Christmas they haven’t had to go carefully’ GOOD! THIS IS WELL INTEGRATED! and implied that the family has had money issues in the past, Nora gives the money to the Porter and doesn’t ask for change. This is perhaps the first hint in the play societal thinking, during that era. Are there words missing from this sentence? I'm not sure what your point is/ Through this quote, Nora’s deludes the Porter of the low financial position of her family and gives the illusion that they are in a better condition than they actually are. This ornamentation word check of one’s socioeconomic status and an exemplification of the importance of it, is an everlasting theme amongst literature and subsequently, a reflection of society. Try and focus on what Ibsen is suggesting rather than making these generalised statements about the 'themes' of 'literature' as a whole. According to this notion of Marxism, Nora has become overwhelmed by her surroundings to the extent that she feels no option but to submit to the patriarchal society. How is this a demonstration of Marxist ideals? What's the connection between Marxism and Nora feeling forced to submit to the patriarchy?


Through-out the majority of the play Nora is portrayed as the subservient wife, ready to propitiate her husband, believing him the ‘head of the household’ and her caretaker. Excellent T.S. Ibsen portrays this social norm through her dialogue, ‘I would never dream of doing anything you didn’t want me to’. Needs integration Though through the surrounding conversation by Helmer, ‘All right then! It’s really just my little joke’, and ‘I know that’, needs integration it can be deduced that she is saying this out of love, this phrase is a striking representation of society at the time. Ibsen creates a presentation of women as being unable to dream, let alone act upon thoughts that would potentially be against the wishes of their male counterparts; highlighting upon the extent of subjugation evident amongst society towards women, such that even ‘her’ dreams are being controlled and fine-lined word check to fit inside the boundaries of a patriarchal society. Aside from some minor expression issues, this is an awesome sentence! :) However it is not only Nora’s dialogue that becomes a reminder of a woman’s ‘place’, but also the dialogue of her husband, Helmer. Helmer has opted to utilize morality expression is a bit clunky and honesty in order to achieve his success, both of which have been to some extent fruitful to him and thus, he is portrayed as the ‘pillar of society’. Wait, so, he's moral and honest --> he achieves success --> he's a pillar of society? How did we get to that last step?? However, included in this pillar ??? is the acceptance of Helmer’s superiority over Nora, an idea Helmer exercises through the way in which he addresses his wife.  In the very first page of the play, he addresses Nora as his "little sky-lark chirping," (<-- integrate quotes like this so you don't have to use the word "my" in any of the following statements) ‘my little sky-lark chirping’ and in the proceeding pages, ‘my little squirrel frisking’ and ‘my pretty little pet’. Upon analysis of these nicknames it is evident of their substandard connotation. In all, he refers to her as an animal, substantiating society’s view of women as the ‘lesser’. Ibsen artfully couples each animal name with a verb to allow Helmer to accentuate his superiority over Nora. How does the use of verbs lead to this interpretation? The extent of this superiority is realized to audiences later when Nora herself begins calling herself ‘it’; ‘we call it a spendthrift’. Is she really referring to herself here? I don't have the play with me but I'm not sure that's what this quote means. This discourse perhaps takes another level of subjugation, through likening Nora, a woman, with an inanimate object that has no feelings or personal thoughts. Through the symbolism of referring Nora to as an object, Ibsen’s society is articulately reflected, through the positioning of women to be ‘conscious-less’. Good, but careful with your use of commas. More astounding than this is the ease at with which Nora refers to herself as an ‘it’, highlighting that this discourse would have been a common occurrence. Thus, through this, Helmer surreptitiously reminds Nora of her place as the ‘working wife’ and the ‘sacrificer’, so that when the time comes Helmer is in the domineering position to give his wife everything, except that which society at the time restricted him from giving;
"Helmer:  I would gladly work night and day for you. Nora- bear sorrow and want for your sake. But no …………man would sacrifice his honor for the one he loves.
Nora: It is a thing hundreds of thousands of women have done.” Don't end a paragraph with a quote you haven't analysed.

Ibsen enhances the lack of feminism not sure this is accurate. Unless you're saying he's criticuing the lack of feminist equality in society? The text doesn't really enhance the lack of deminism though through careful use of discourse to portray certain character traits amongst his characters that, at the era of production would have been viewed as flaws and a retardation from societal norms. To cope with the behavioral boundaries imposed from society, certain character’s no apostrophe placed strategies in which to cope, ? one of these strategies being ‘control’. Examples of character’sno apostrophe attempting to control their environment are a frequent occurrence throughout the play, catalyzed primarily by their subjugation and victimization. Though Nora openly stated, ‘I would never dream of doing anything you didn’t want me to’, as the play progresses she disregards Helmer’s wishes on spending less money, eating sweets and paying for her husband’s treatment. expression Perhaps the primary example of Nora’s need to control her environment is the reason she takes her husband on holiday. Nora believed that Helmer was in dire need of a vacation, despite Helmer making it clear that he didn’t want to go, ‘(when Nora presented the idea), just paraphrase this information and only quote what you need ‘being frivolous, that it was his duty as a husband not to give in to all the whims and fancies of mine’. Despite this reluctance on Helmer’s part, who? decides to hide the true extent of her husband’s illness from him and insists on taking him, ‘It was necessary he should have no idea what a dangerous condition he was in. It was to me that the doctors came and said that his life was in danger, and that the only thing to save him was to live in the south. Do you suppose I didn't try, first of all, to get what I wanted as if it were for myself?’ This needs integrating, and it's a bit too long at the moment - find the part of this quote that's supporting your point and just hone in on that. This excerpt portrays Nora’s nature, but what aspects of her nature does it portray, and how does it portray them? and the resultant effect of her suppression. Nora, in taking a loan out, was ready to ‘take the law into her own hands’ and becoming a ‘hypocrite, a liar, and worse than that, a criminal! Mr’s Linde is also shocked when she hears of Nora’s actions;
"Mrs Linde: Listen, Nora, are you sure you haven’t done something rash?
Nora: Is it rash to save your husband’s life?
Mrs Linde: I think it’s rash if you do it without his knowledge"
Perhaps it's a requirement/recommendation that you quote like this, but I think you could easily cherry-pick the important words here and just include them in your analysis rather than just chucking three whole lines of dialogue in the middle of your essay      
It is evident through discourse, that Nora is still oblivious to the illegality of her actions and has little comprehension of the magnitude of misfortune she may be in. Expression. You can't be 'in misfortune' Conversely, the exchange becomes an illumination of Nora’s frame of thinking; for her, any method she may take to reach a particular end point is justified if she reaches the desired end point ensues Good!.  Her approach to this dilemma is to control the situation, through bypassing any consultation that may result in an idea contradictory to her’s. No apostrophe Her statement, ‘‘I would never dream of doing anything you didn’t want me to’ become seemingly more and more implausible as the play progresses. This is an awesome statement, but you haven't really unpacked it here, so it feels a little underdeveloped being stuck at the end of a paragraph.   

Despite Nora’s autarchic actions, she remains un-punished one word; no hyphen. This however, changes following Nora’s fraudulent actions and her subsequent treatment of Krogstad, which prompts him to write a letter to Helmer with the intention of disclosing his wife’s actions.  It is at this stage another one of Nora’s controlled situation’s no apostrophe emerges and Nora, out of desperationneed a comma here searches for ways to prevent Hemler from opening the letterbox and learning of her secret. Ibsen portrays the ghastly effects of the subjugation upon women, through an exploration of the side-effect of deception. Nora, when practicing her dance need a comma here turns the situation to her advantage, no comma here by deterring her husband from checking the letter-box were Krogstad had placed the letter;            
"Nora: What are you going to do there?
Helmer: Only see if any letters have come.
Nora: No, no! Don’t do that, Torvald!
Helmer: Why not?
Nora: Torvald, please don't. There aren’t any.
Helmer: Just let me see."
See above re: quoting. What's important here? You haven't been specific enough about the evidence you're dealing with.
Subsequently, Nora successfully gains her husband’s attention and she begins to dance so wildly that he has to tell her, ‘Not so Fast! Not so Fast!’ and ‘Not so wild, Nora!’ Perhaps the most important discourse Ibsen utilises to present the desperation of Nora and her subsequent need to control, is portrayed through, no commas here ‘Nora you are dancing as if your life depended on it’, to which she replies, ‘it does’.  This discourse accurately portrays the position of women amongst society at the time, and more importantly, the position of the wife. The negative consequences of the patriarchal society become evident as Nora finds that her ‘life depended’ upon keeping her actions a secret and ensuring her husband never discovers her mistake, and thus devises a stratagem to cover-up the action, reflecting the austere expectations for women to fit the role of the innocent and be the perfect wife, to the extent that Nora described it as a matter of life. Good; sentence structure is a little bit messy, but the analysis is much clearer. Subjecting woman to these extreme conditions for large interludes can be described as the cause of Nora’s controlling tendencies. From a post-feministic view-point is can be concluded that Ibsen, through the use of discourse presented his society with a reflection of itself, ??? with the intention of illustrating the resultant effects of this severe subjugation, and thus, in doing so, Ibsen not only provides a description of society at the time, but also explores the resultant future effects repetition of the hierarchal society; no semicolon here in which women were enforced to conceive severe processes to cope.

Deception is a peculiarity often associated profoundly to with control, and thus starting to overuse this as a linking word; try and vary it with 'therefore'/ 'hence' etc. becomes another subterfuge through which Ibsen echoes societal values. Ibsen articulately incorporates deception within A Doll’s house,make sure you properly capitalise the whole thing and use 'single quote marks' when writing the title to create a replication of the deleterious features of society and the coping mechanism’s women in the 19th century adopted as a means of survival. This innate characteristic of deception is evident within the opening of the play and becomes the first test of Nora’s honesty; a test that she fails. Helmer repeatedly makes it clear that he doesn’t approve of Nora ‘popping into the confectioner’s’. Upon Nora’s return Helmer immediately questions her as to if she ‘forgot herself in town?’ and ‘Hasn’t miss sweet-tooth been breaking rules in town today?’ Nora immediately denies this, ‘no I assure you Trovold’ integration despite audiences later observing that she ‘takes the bag out of her hand’, and offers them to Dr. Rank, stating, ‘what about a little macaroon?’ To this, even the doctor questions her, ‘I thought they (referring to the mararoons) were forbidden here’ integration. Through this discourse, Ibsen divulges that after eight years of marriage in a patriarchal society, Nora has developed strategies in which to be able to follow her likes and dislikes, expression while concurrently keeping her husband happy. This was a direct portrayal of 19th century Norwegian society, where women were expected to give up many of their personal preferences in order to please their husbands. bit redundant

Though it may be possible to overlook the ‘little white lies’, some of Nora’s deception, however, has larger is there a more descriptive word you could use here? consequences. Another example of Nora’s deception appears again in an interaction between Helmer;
"Helmer; Do you remember last Christmas? Three whole weeks beforehand you shut yourself up every evening till after midnight making flowers for the Christmas tree and all the other splendid things you wanted to surprise us with. Ugh, I never felt so bored in all my life.
Nora: I wasn’t the least bit bored.
Helmer (smiling). But it turned a bit of an anticlimax, Nora."
The audience then learns the truth about what Nora was actually doing when she ‘shut yourself up every evening’ a few passages later through her conversation with her friend Mrs. Linde, ‘Last winter I was lucky enough to get a lot of copying to do; so I locked myself up and sat writing every evening until quite late at night’ integrate Despite Nora’s justification for these lies to be of a good nature, expression her deceptive nature is still evident. One deceptive act translates into another, and Nora’s nature changes completely as she attempts to cope with the cultural and social values of society. The danger of Nora’s deception, however, is not fully recognized until another conversation with Mr’s. Linde when she asks, ‘Won’t you ever tell him?’, to which Nora replies, ‘perhaps one day’ and ‘Then it might be a good idea to have something up my sleeve’. It is evident through this dialogue that Nora feels no guilt or humiliation in the lengths she goes to, to achieve her way. Thus, through discourse, no need to keep stressing this Ibsen once again proves Nora’s adaptability to her environment; she has learned to survive and control a situation, from the position of the beleaguered and subservient wife.                              
Throughout the progression of the play, Nora’s little lies continue and audiences are given the impression that she may be habitual liar, this doesn't really flow on from the previous discussion a trait even Helmer discovers;    
"Helmer: Has anyone been here?
Nora: Here? No.
Helmer: That’s funny. I saw Krogstad leaving the house.
Nora: Really? Yes, that’s right, Krogstad was here for a minute."
It becomes evident through this discourse, that Nora has made a routine of lying, to a magnitude that she doesn’t need to think twice on lying to serve her own purpose, even to those closest to her. This demeanor endures throughout the play, climaxing in Act 3, at what which time Nora makes the final assertion of her departure. Though this scene brought on enthusiastic welcome from many feminists throughout time, a deeper look, indicates the real dark reason of the ‘doll’s’ abrupt departure from her house. The survival strategies Nora originally employed have evidently failed her, however, instead of changing her ways, Nora adapts to her new situation through careful modification of her strategies. She does this through the monopolisation of discourse and an obstinate repudiation to discuss the reasons for her departure lovely writing, but you need evidence for this. Stating this and then chucking some quotes in the next sentence isn't enough. Nora then departs from her untenable situation, declaring; ‘I must stand on my own two feet if I'm to get to know myself and the world outside. That's why I can't stay here with you any longer.’ Thus, through an articulate utilization of discourse, Ibsen presents the 19th century woman as immature and deceitful, however also displays that expression as time passes she becomes more able to decide what it best for her. Ibsen reveals and discusses the social and cultural position of women in his context and the innate resultant instinct expression of survival some developed in order to achieve some happiness in the strictly patriarchal society. This progression of Nora, developing from the submissive wife who, on the surface, obeyed her husbands ‘commands’, to the emergence on a ‘new Nora’; Okay, if you're arguing that she was only obeying her husband 'on the surface,' how much has she actually changed? Do you think her values were always there, or were they instilled through her suffering? You don't necessarily have to answer this here, but it's a really central question in ADH that might be worth exploring a women who decided to place herself first, is a direct symbolism word check of Ibsen’s society through the exploration of the concept of feminism and it’s growth some decades proceeding A Doll’s House.


Ibsen corroborates, word check through the accentuation of discourse, that Norwegian society during the 19th century was manifested by a severe patriarchal stance. Ibsen highlight’s no apostrophe the effects of this frame of thinking through the deviation of ‘stereotypical’ behaviors in relation to gender, namely, Nora’s infatuation with control and deceit to escape the entrapment and subjugation placed heavily upon females. A Doll's House is a reflection of the social and cultural norms so is it reinforcing social values, or challenging them? as it deals with prominent issues that occurred during 19th century; discussing not only society’s conditions but also the resultant effects upon the subjugated.
A lot of this is a bit nit-picky since it's hard to make really broad comments, but the three most important things to work on:
- paragraph structure
- quote integration
- punctuation (esp. commas and apostrophes)
You seem to know the text very well, but some more clarity in what each paragraph is setting out to accomplish + ensuring you're writing and quoting grammatically would go a long way :)

Let me know if you have any questions - sorry I can only be of limited help here.