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June 22, 2024, 02:44:04 am

Author Topic: Is it acceptable to use statistics for an ad analysis oral introduction  (Read 2059 times)

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gabeweeb

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I am debating whether it is adequate or not to provide a statistic with your introduction for an advertisement analysis oral or not. I just think that providing a related stat can hook the audience but I am not sure if it is suitable since it isn't a persuasive piece, but it is rather an analysis piece.
I was thinking of something like this:

Hello my name is Gabe and every 15 minutes a teenager will die due to drunk driving, this advertisement created by Ecovia in December, 2012 tackles with the problematic topic of drinking and driving and I will be analyzing this ad today. 

Idk i'm in grade 9 and im dumb lol

Joseph41

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Re: Is it acceptable to use statistics for an ad analysis oral introduction
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2018, 04:51:11 pm »
+2
Hey, sorry for the late reply.

Quote
Idk i'm in grade 9 and im dumb lol

I dispute this! I wouldn't put yourself down; there's no such thing as a stupid question if you genuinely don't know the answer. Trust me: I asked about a million questions through high school, made a heap of mistakes, and came out fine. You will, too. :)

Quote
I am debating whether it is adequate or not to provide a statistic with your introduction for an advertisement analysis oral or not. I just think that providing a related stat can hook the audience but I am not sure if it is suitable since it isn't a persuasive piece, but it is rather an analysis piece.
I was thinking of something like this:

Hello my name is Gabe and every 15 minutes a teenager will die due to drunk driving, this advertisement created by Ecovia in December, 2012 tackles with the problematic topic of drinking and driving and I will be analyzing this ad today.

To be honest, I'm not 100% sure on this as I'm not fully clear of what the task is. But my gut feeling is that if the piece is intended to be analytical, I'd try to stick to analysis - at least for the vast majority. In saying that, it sounds as though the statistic would merely be used to provide context to the advertisement, and I don't think that's a bad thing at all. :)

Oxford comma, Garamond, Avett Brothers, Orla Gartland enthusiast.

Bri MT

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Re: Is it acceptable to use statistics for an ad analysis oral introduction
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2018, 05:05:09 pm »
+3
I am debating whether it is adequate or not to provide a statistic with your introduction for an advertisement analysis oral or not. I just think that providing a related stat can hook the audience but I am not sure if it is suitable since it isn't a persuasive piece, but it is rather an analysis piece.
I was thinking of something like this:

Hello my name is Gabe and every 15 minutes a teenager will die due to drunk driving, this advertisement created by Ecovia in December, 2012 tackles with the problematic topic of drinking and driving and I will be analyzing this ad today. 

Idk i'm in grade 9 and im dumb lol

In my experience engagement is always beneficial - even if the speech isn't designed to be persuasive

My main feedback would be to consider breaking that sentence into more digestible fragments and/or rewording it.
Eg. "I'm Gabe, just another teenager, just like most of the people in this room. Every 15 minutes, another teenager will die due to drink driving. This problematic issue was tackled by Ecovia in a December 2012 advertisement, and that ad will be the focus of this speech."

   One of the great tools you can use in public speaking is pauses, which can help the audience seperate ideas and understand the structure of the speech. Clarity (including having a clear structure) is especially important because the audience can't go back and reread something if they have difficulty understanding it.