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February 26, 2024, 06:30:11 pm

Author Topic: Is it worth doing Legal Studies in Year 10?  (Read 3961 times)  Share 

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TheMan10

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Is it worth doing Legal Studies in Year 10?
« on: August 12, 2020, 03:16:28 pm »
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This is my first time on this website and it's getting near to the time when I will have to be thinking about what subjects I want to partake, in year 11 and 12. My school offers accelerated subjects, one of which caught my interest; Legal Studies. I was wondering if I should do it considering my circumstances. I enjoy playing games and sport a lot, that's what filled up my week before COVID-19. I am really good with my school work and finished with a 90% average for exams in year 8. I am going into year 10 next year and will be doing Chinese, French, 2 sciences and possibly Legal Studies. I was just wondering if it is the right thing to do, I am not sure what career I am interested in nor what subjects I will undertake in VCE and like I mentioned before I enjoy sport and games which takes up a lot of time and I think my parents will limit it greatly if I choose to do Legal Studies, they want me to do it because all they care about is my ATAR. Any advice?

AngelWings

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Re: Is it worth doing Legal Studies in Year 10?
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2020, 08:06:01 pm »
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I assume you'll be taking Units 1/2 of Legal Studies next year if you did it? If so, it's actually quite a common subject for people to accelerate and many people accelerate at least 1 subject.

I was wondering if I should do it considering my circumstances. I enjoy playing games and sport a lot, that's what filled up my week before COVID-19. I am really good with my school work and finished with a 90% average for exams in year 8. I am going into year 10 next year and will be doing Chinese, French, 2 sciences and possibly Legal Studies. I was just wondering if it is the right thing to do, I am not sure what career I am interested in nor what subjects I will undertake in VCE
My advice here is to have a look at the study design (the curriculum), which you can do so here. This will let you know what you'll learn (and if it changes, roughly what you'll learn) next year and if it sounds like something you'll enjoy, then by all means, go for it! It doesn't seem like anything is blocking you besides your own uncertainty. (And as I said, Legal Studies is usually a popular subject to accelerate, so you would likely not be the only Year 10 in your Unit 1/2 Legal Studies class.)
 
As for whether it fits your career or not, it doesn't quite matter whether it does, as you can usually use one of the other subjects in Year 11/12 to fulfil the prerequisites for your desired uni course (or whatever higher education you so choose, if that's what you want to do in the future) that you wish to take after VCE. The main caveat here is if you really want to take a bunch of super heavy subjects that I would recommend taking a more content-heavy subject first. However, since you're quite undecided on your other VCE subjects currently, that caveat is not really something I'd consider now and instead, I'd simply take whatever subject you want to accelerate and like.

I enjoy sport and games which takes up a lot of time and I think my parents will limit it greatly if I choose to do Legal Studies, they want me to do it because all they care about is my ATAR. Any advice?
If you can prove that you can do both quite well, then I think your parents would not see the point in limiting it? Having sports and games, regardless of it being done on a professional level or simply just recreation, is generally a good thing, as it gives you something to keep your mind off school when you shouldn't e.g. during your study breaks, and would probably help you learn to time manage better. When it comes to VCE, one of the biggest lessons you can learn is school/ life balance. Studying all the time simply leads to burnout. Not studying enough means that you don't do as well and may not get the results you're after, which would probably anger your parents (as well as yourself). As a result, you need to find a balance of studying and taking (well earnt) breaks, which sports and games can do.
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