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February 24, 2024, 12:50:38 am

Author Topic: Writing Task One examples?  (Read 4902 times)

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Coolgalbornin03Lo

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Writing Task One examples?
« on: October 02, 2020, 12:56:54 pm »
+1
I’m not sure whether my writing is accidentally including arguments so I’d really like to see another high scoring response or even any response that doesn’t have argument.

Is explaining the evidence and what it means making it an regiment?
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bingoman2000

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Re: Writing Task One examples?
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2020, 02:34:33 pm »
+5
Hi there,

GAT Writing Task 1 is certainly quite challenging, and it is difficult to know what exactly constitutes an opinion or argument. My advice to you would be to not excessively worry about this; sometimes the information in the stimulus material lends itself naturally to presenting an argument (e.g. music has had a profound social and economic impact on the world), and in this case, there is no need to be solely focused on just presenting factual information. Nonetheless, as you said, whatever you write needs to be supported by the evidence in the stimulus material, so avoid expressing personal opinions or relying on your own knowledge of the topic beyond the scope of the text.

Best of luck for the GAT and the remainder of your VCE studies and feel free to ask if you need any further advice :)

Cheers,
Anand
« Last Edit: October 02, 2020, 03:02:58 pm by Sine »
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Coolgalbornin03Lo

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Re: Writing Task One examples?
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2020, 03:41:24 pm »
0
Hi there,

GAT Writing Task 1 is certainly quite challenging, and it is difficult to know what exactly constitutes an opinion or argument. My advice to you would be to not excessively worry about this; sometimes the information in the stimulus material lends itself naturally to presenting an argument (e.g. music has had a profound social and economic impact on the world), and in this case, there is no need to be solely focused on just presenting factual information. Nonetheless, as you said, whatever you write needs to be supported by the evidence in the stimulus material, so avoid expressing personal opinions or relying on your own knowledge of the topic beyond the scope of the text.

Best of luck for the GAT and the remainder of your VCE studies and feel free to ask if you need any further advice :)

Cheers,
Anand

That’s exactly the one I wrote to!!!! I talked about economic impact because the stimulus did talk about the money etc. But I was trying not to bring in outside knowledge I was just saying that’s why it’s a large part of society still etc. the benefits.....not only economical but also to do with personal wellbeing....
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2020: English | Methods | Biology | Chemistry |              Psychology | ATAR: 0
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Roger Luo

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Re: Writing Task One examples?
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2020, 10:35:11 pm »
+1
This is not my example, but if you want one you can see it in: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4h5ttw8kkA

It's the English lab's video

here is the transcript:

A human being’s sense of smell plays a vital and ongoing role in our everyday lives. For a system that is used so much by people, it really is an intricate process. Our brain ends up receiving a signal from the many olfactory sensors and then interprets the odour. No two individuals share the exact same sense of smell and there’s a wide range of factors, ranging from one’s diet and age to medication they may be on, that can have an impact on how the process works within a person.

Before thinking about all of the ways that scent impacts on our daily lives in modern times, it is worth thinking about the sense’s role in early human survival. Newborn babies can develop a bond with their mother through smell - this being one of the first instances where scent has an impact on our emotions. Our sense of smell develops and reaches its peak at the age of ten. It is from here that human beings begin to react more to these pheromones as they develop an attraction to others. It really is no wonder that annual sales of perfume are in excess of forty billion dollars!

As time goes on, sales of deodorant continue to rise and this is expected to continue strongly. Our desire to put out an attractive scent to others has been with us for centuries, with evidence of ornate vases used for perfume dating back to the 14th century.

So smells can be aesthetically pleasing, such as fragrant perfume, the smell of delicious warm bread toasting, but it isn’t all pleasant. Body odour, an inevitable aspect of life, can be significantly displeasing! Because of this unavoidable stench, the size of the global deodorant market has significantly increased from 14.9 billion US dollars to a predicted 24.1 billion US dollars in 2021, meaning there is a popular cure for dreaded body odour.  “The persuasive power of an odour” cannot always be “fended” off though, stinky fish and rubbish for example have no remedy. This can be crucial when eating, as our sense of smell accounts for 75%-95% of the impact of a flavour.

Of all the amazing things we can discuss about the human sense of smell, it pales in comparison to the smelling abilities of our canine friends. The twelve million olfactory receptor cells owned by humans is dwarfed by the one billion cells held by dogs, with the bloodhound having four times as many as other breeds! Such sniffing abilities have been utilised by police dogs and other service animals who use their heightened senses to help their human friends.