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June 14, 2024, 10:02:40 am

Author Topic: University dilemma - theoretical physics  (Read 20670 times)  Share 

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Akirus

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Re: University dilemma - theoretical physics
« Reply #30 on: June 26, 2010, 06:03:41 pm »
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I'm planning on becoming a physicist and am doing my degree at Melbourne University. You don't do quantum field theory or general relativity until fourth year (well first year of masters), but it's good to get the basics done first and then tackle these two advanced topics. If you really want an accelerated pathway, go to ANU since /0 is already doing subjects in first year that I will be doing in third year.

In your defense, he did UMEP so technically he's on second year. I would rather treat grad school separately, since there's nothing stopping me from doing GR/QFT again in honors year if I want to, it just seems to me like having the option to cover this stuff doing your undergrad is nice. If I want to get into Ivy League after honors, it seems like having a stronger foundation would be beneficial there, or am I mistaken?

QuantumJG

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Re: University dilemma - theoretical physics
« Reply #31 on: June 26, 2010, 07:00:19 pm »
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If you are aiming at the Ivy League Universities (Although MIT, Caltech are also the best places to physics aswell) then definitely go for ANU's PhB.

 
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TrueTears

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Re: University dilemma - theoretical physics
« Reply #32 on: June 26, 2010, 07:04:11 pm »
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I'm planning on becoming a physicist and am doing my degree at Melbourne University. You don't do quantum field theory or general relativity until fourth year (well first year of masters), but it's good to get the basics done first and then tackle these two advanced topics. If you really want an accelerated pathway, go to ANU since /0 is already doing subjects in first year that I will be doing in third year.

In your defense, he did UMEP so technically he's on second year. I would rather treat grad school separately, since there's nothing stopping me from doing GR/QFT again in honors year if I want to, it just seems to me like having the option to cover this stuff doing your undergrad is nice. If I want to get into Ivy League after honors, it seems like having a stronger foundation would be beneficial there, or am I mistaken?
also i think /0 was allowed to skip some subjects since he self-studied alot of physics after year 12 :P
PhD @ MIT (Economics).

Interested in asset pricing, econometrics, and social choice theory.

Akirus

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Re: University dilemma - theoretical physics
« Reply #33 on: June 26, 2010, 07:48:10 pm »
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If you are aiming at the Ivy League Universities (Although MIT, Caltech are also the best places to physics aswell) then definitely go for ANU's PhB.

 

Yeah, IITs are good too, MIT would be one of my top preferences. Not too worried about it for now, though, that's still at least four years away.

I'm planning on becoming a physicist and am doing my degree at Melbourne University. You don't do quantum field theory or general relativity until fourth year (well first year of masters), but it's good to get the basics done first and then tackle these two advanced topics. If you really want an accelerated pathway, go to ANU since /0 is already doing subjects in first year that I will be doing in third year.

In your defense, he did UMEP so technically he's on second year. I would rather treat grad school separately, since there's nothing stopping me from doing GR/QFT again in honors year if I want to, it just seems to me like having the option to cover this stuff doing your undergrad is nice. If I want to get into Ivy League after honors, it seems like having a stronger foundation would be beneficial there, or am I mistaken?
also i think /0 was allowed to skip some subjects since he self-studied alot of physics after year 12 :P

Looking forward to the three or so months following VCE :)