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December 01, 2022, 02:28:23 pm

Author Topic: Literary Homelands elective help  (Read 3616 times)  Share 

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rirerire

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Literary Homelands elective help
« on: October 04, 2020, 04:20:57 pm »
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I just read over the literary homelands syllabus and I noticed one of the final lines is about "complex and diverse migrant experiences" although I know I shouldn't get hung up over one line the question could be based around that and my texts don't explore that idea in depth-
any ideas on how I could frame The White Tiger and A Passage to India around a question like
'To what extent have the perspectives in your texts evolved to explore complex and diverse migrant experiences' (ok maybe not the best structured question of all time...)

our third prescribed text for the module was Eileen Chong's 'burning rice' poetry (heavy migrant experiences) however my understanding of that is quite rudimentary so I'd have to study it from the start... would I be better off doing that?

angewina_naguen

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Re: Literary Homelands elective help
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2020, 11:23:34 pm »
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I just read over the literary homelands syllabus and I noticed one of the final lines is about "complex and diverse migrant experiences" although I know I shouldn't get hung up over one line the question could be based around that and my texts don't explore that idea in depth-
any ideas on how I could frame The White Tiger and A Passage to India around a question like
'To what extent have the perspectives in your texts evolved to explore complex and diverse migrant experiences' (ok maybe not the best structured question of all time...)

our third prescribed text for the module was Eileen Chong's 'burning rice' poetry (heavy migrant experiences) however my understanding of that is quite rudimentary so I'd have to study it from the start... would I be better off doing that?

Hey, rirerire!

From my understanding, both of those texts do explore migration as a central idea. Migration simply refers to the movement of an individual or collective from one place to another which can happen within a country or across national borders, differing from immigration which suggests the movement, and relocation, of an individual or collective to another country. Both of those prescribed texts explore the process of migration and how travel affects one's perception of what a "home" is and the "homeland." To address that aspect of the rubric, you might raise how migration is inherently an experience which results in incredible conflicts, challenges and struggles. However, it is through these processes that the individuals within the text are able to overcome adversity and establish within the literary world of the text an enhanced understanding of themselves, others and the world around them.

As for your second question, it really depends on what you think will be better for you long term. I personally think it would be good to prepare enough quotes and techniques for perhaps two body paragraphs that you could write using Burning Rice in the event that you get a question which it would be more favourable to use her poems. The last thing you want is to come out of the exam wishing you had prepared something for it instead. If you feel less compelled to Chong's poetry, I would just recommend going with the other two texts instead and search for more examples which can help you explore the process and impact of migration conceptually in your response. Either way, as long as you actively address the question you are given and engage with its ideas in your analysis, you will come out fine  :D Hope that helps but feel free to follow up with more questions if you have any!

Angelina  ;D
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